Rating for PTSD?

Discussion in 'PTSD and Mental Health Conditions' started by GirlTrucker, Feb 17, 2017 at 12:09 AM.

  1. GirlTrucker

    GirlTrucker Registered Member

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    I am the caregiver of a current service member who is up for MEB due to knee issues but also suffers from a pretty severe case of PTSD. What factors are taken into account when determining the rating for PTSD?

    Although my husband is currently hanging on in his job in the military, he calls me on the phone about five or six times in a ten hour workday because something has upset him. If he gets really upset, I actually come to his shop (he is "the boss" with 17 years in) under the guise of bringing him food.

    His PTSD is from running convoys so driving also makes him pretty crazy. He has god awful road rage that would frighten any sane person. I end up doing the vast majority of the driving, including driving him to and from work sometimes.

    He also becomes very stressed out in crowds and sometimes has outbursts that I have to quell. Simple tasks such as filling out paperwork at a medical facility induce a hail of profanities if he gets frustrated. I go to all of his medical appointments with him and I usually end up having to complete the paperwork for him if the form is more than a page or two.

    He has been working with a therapist on a weekly basis for the past year plus taking meds but neither has been effective. His therapist almost labeled him as unfit for duty a few weeks ago. Fortunately, I am certified as a peer support specialist for PTSD so I know how to handle his outbursts. I feel more like a handler than a wife sometimes.

    What level of disability rating could the VA assign him based upon the above symptoms? I am terrified of them rating him at 30% or some other low rating. He literally requires at least part time care from someone who is trained to understand mental health issues. The only way that his issues would be completely "fixed" is if he never had to deal with other people ever again.
     
  2. gsfowler

    gsfowler Staff Member PEB Forum Veteran

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    It will come down to the provider's opinion when they do the compensation and pension evaluation.

    Here is a copy of the disability benefits questionnaire (DBQ) http://www.vba.va.gov/pubs/forms/VBA-21-0960P-3-ARE.pdf

    The rating criteria is based upon the answers on the questionnaire, section IV discusses occupational and social impairment.

    In 4A there are checkboxes, match them up to the statements below.


    General Rating Formula for Mental Disorders:


    Total occupational and social impairment, due to such symptoms as:

    gross impairment in thought processes or communication;

    persistent delusions or hallucinations; grossly inappropriate

    behavior; persistent danger of hurting self or others; intermittent

    inability to perform activities of daily living (including maintenance

    of minimal personal hygiene); disorientation to time or place; memory

    loss for names of close relatives, own occupation, or own name ..................... 100


    Occupational and social impairment, with deficiencies in most areas,

    such as work, school, family relations, judgment, thinking, or mood,

    due to such symptoms as: suicidal ideation; obsessional rituals

    which interfere with routine activities; speech intermittently illogical,

    obscure, or irrelevant; near-continuous panic or depression affecting

    the ability to function independently, appropriately and effectively;

    impaired impulse control (such as unprovoked irritability with periods

    of violence); spatial disorientation; neglect of personal appearance and

    hygiene; difficulty in adapting to stressful circumstances (including

    work or a worklike setting); inability to establish and maintain

    effective relationships ......................................................................................... 70


    Occupational and social impairment with reduced reliability and

    productivity due to such symptoms as: flattened affect; circumstantial,

    circumlocutory, or stereotyped speech; panic attacks more than once

    a week; difficulty in understanding complex commands; impairment

    of short- and long-term memory (e.g., retention of only highly learned

    material, forgetting to complete tasks); impaired judgment; impaired

    abstract thinking; disturbances of motivation and mood; difficulty in

    establishing and maintaining effective work and social relationships ................. 50


    Occupational and social impairment with occasional decrease in work

    efficiency and intermittent periods of inability to perform occupational

    tasks (although generally functioning satisfactorily, with routine

    behavior, self-care, and conversation normal), due to such symptoms

    as: depressed mood, anxiety, suspiciousness, panic attacks (weekly or

    less often), chronic sleep impairment, mild memory loss (such as

    forgetting names, directions, recent events) ........................................................ 30


    Occupational and social impairment due to mild or transient symptoms

    which decrease work efficiency and ability to perform occupational

    tasks only during periods of significant stress, or; symptoms controlled

    by continuous medication ................................................................................... 10


    A mental condition has been formally diagnosed, but symptoms are not

    severe enough either to interfere with occupational and social

    functioning or to require continuous medication................................................... 0
     

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