Cancer, Stem Cell Transplant, Rhabdomyolysis

millersarge1

Registered Member
#1
Looking for advice, I’m currently in the AGR Program, total 12 years active and AGR, 31 years total service for pay. In 2008 I was diagnosed with Stage IV Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, I went through a heavy dose of chemotherapy, a year later Cancer came back. Diagnosed again with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma stage III. In 2010 I had a Autologous stem cell transplant. The transplant worked for five years. In 2015 the cancer returned. Stage III Non-Hodgkin Folicular Lymphoma. August of 2015 I had a Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant. Transplant went well for the most part. Currently I am being treated for rhabdomyolysis due to graft vs host disease from complications of the Allogeneic Transplant.

Currently I’m on a lot of medications, I have to check my sugar levels three times a day due to the amount of steroids I’m taking, If my counts are high I have to take insulin shots, I have received IVIG infusions often, I have one scheduled for Tuesday. My days are up and down, some days I feel good, most days I struggle. I’m currently on a permanent profile, walking, push ups and sit ups, subject for profile is Non-Hodgkins Lyphoma. Currently due to rhabdomyolysis, I’m unable to take the APFT. Under my doctors care until released. Should I start the process of a medical retirement? Tough it out? When I was first diagnosed my oncologist told me I would have 3 outcomes. 1. I would die from the disease. 2. I would be cured. 3. I would have to live with the disease. Looks like today I’m going to have live with it and maintain and reveive the best possible treatments according to diagnosed. The AGR Program has been a blessing treatment wise. I’m non-deplorable for at least 3 more years. I really enjoy what I do and I feel like I bring a lot to the table. But today my body is telling me it may be time to let it go. I’m 48 years old, I have a family, they have seen struggle with this disease for a very long time and balance a very demanding job. Which in turn has help me to keep my mind off the disease. I’m also seeing a counselor, she is helping me to cope with all of this, it’s been a big help.

Question again, what should I do? What’s my best course of action? Thank you for time.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#2
I'm sorry to hear of your health struggles. There is no right answer to your question. Work appears to bring you a great deal of satisfaction, but is also very demanding.

When we are too sick, work is a burden. On better days, works contributes to meaningfulness.

GVH, as you know, can be a serious complication of transplantation. On you can determine which course is better for you. It sounds like on some day continuing to work is best and on other days retirement is best. Perhaps a daily journal of 1) how you feel each day and 2) how demanding work was - would help you decide.

Best wishes
Mike
 

millersarge1

Registered Member
#3
Thank you for replying back, its good to have an unbiased opinion. A lot of soldier's and family ask me frequently why do I keep working. God has blessed me with a wonderful life, a good job and a wonderful family that supports me. I see the light at the end of the tunnel and currently the treatment plan and medications are working well. l I'm going to keep pushing on and trusting in God for his sustaining power, the guard has been very good to me. Thanks again, I may post again later.
 

Vamica89

Registered Member
#4
Sorry to hear that i have also a non-Hodgkin lymphoma grade 3A stage 2, if i was u i will go medboard and enjoy my family. I just finish my RCHOP treatment and i getting out. Family first then anything also will go for.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#5
I admire your direction. Having direction in life makes a significant, positive difference; even when circumstances throws us a curve ball.
 
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