Retirement Ceremony or not

GA Boy

Registered Member
#1
Dear fellow PEB members.



I have a quick question. When you get your results from your medical evaluation board and it comes back 50% DOD in 100% VA do are you eligible for a retirement ceremony, A flag flown wherever you want him to be flown, and basically everything as if I'm retiring after 20 years of service. I have been in for 15 years nowand when I got my findings back of 50% DOD and 100% VA my Command Master Cheifd said that I couldn't get that but my Pablo said I was entitled to everything. Where can I find this instruction this way I could show my CMCthat it can happen?





Thank you guys and gals so much advance.



AD2 (AW) Wall, W.C.
 

Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#3
Dear fellow PEB members.



I have a quick question. When you get your results from your medical evaluation board and it comes back 50% DOD in 100% VA do are you eligible for a retirement ceremony, A flag flown wherever you want him to be flown, and basically everything as if I'm retiring after 20 years of service. I have been in for 15 years nowand when I got my findings back of 50% DOD and 100% VA my Command Master Cheifd said that I couldn't get that but my Pablo said I was entitled to everything. Where can I find this instruction this way I could show my CMCthat it can happen?





Thank you guys and gals so much advance.



AD2 (AW) Wall, W.C.
Yes, you are:

http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-n...an/1000/1800Retirement/Documents/1800-010.pdf
 

FloridaInjuredInCombat

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#4
Does this apply to medically retiring National Guardsmen as well? If so, does anyone know which regulation or instruction might cover it?

Think I found it, http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r600_8_7.pdf

Basically says all components including Guard and Reserve will offer an appropriate formal retirement ceremony.


Army Regulation 600–8–7
8–10. Retirement ceremony

Army National Guard leadership will ensure all Soldiers have an opportunity to participate in an appropriate retirement ceremony and receive the standard Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package as outlined in paragraph 2–2. The Commander, IMCOM (para 1–4i) is not responsible for funding the Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program package to honor Soldiers retiring from the ARNG. All ARNG retirement applications need to indicate whether the retiree has received the commendation package, by attaching a generic memorandum indicating receipt of the package.

NICE :)
 
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Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#5
Does this apply to medically retiring National Guardsmen as well? If so, does anyone know which regulation or instruction might cover it? Thanks.
Yes, it does....as a general point, EVERY RETIREE IS ENTITLED TO A CEREMONY.

Here are the Army/ARNG specific references:

"8–10. Retirement ceremony Army National Guard leadership will ensure all Soldiers have an opportunity to participate in an appropriate retirement ceremony and receive the standard Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Proram Package as outlined in paragraph 2–2. The Commander, IMCOM (para 1–4i) is not responsible for funding the Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program package to honor Soldiers retiring from the ARNG. All ARNG retirement applications need to indicate whether the retiree has received the commendation package, by attaching a generic memorandum indicating receipt of the package." AR 600-8-7.

"2–2. Principles of support The military personnel system will include a function to— a. Provide Soldiers, regardless of component, the opportunity to participate in an appropriate retirement ceremony as determined by the commander. b. Honor individual retiring Soldiers and their Families in recognition of careers of selfless service to the Army and nation, by issuing the standard Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package upon retirement.
(1) The Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package includes the following:
(a) Fully personalized, full-color letter signed by the Secretary of Army, Chief of Staff of the Army and Sergeant Major of the Army.
(b) Full-color box carrier.
(c) U.S. flag, measuring 3 by 5 feet, cotton outdoor (in accordance with Section 644, Public Law 105–261, or Section 652, PL 106–65).
(d) Retired Army pin, formerly known as the “U.S. Army Retired Lapel Button” (AR 600–8–22).
(e) Two-color window decal (Retired) (one large, two small).
(f) Army Strong DVD. (g) Packaging materials to allow all contents to arrive to retiring Soldier in superior condition.
(2) Retirement certificates (AR 635–5).
c. Assist Soldiers, Family members, and survivors following retirement.
d. Support the Army’s personnel life cycle function of transition."
AR 600-8-7

Note that I am not calling out or criticizing (at least not specifically) @FloridaInjuredInCombat for asking the question. (I am glad he did, because it offers a chance to re-emphasize a point).

BUT- Since the inception of this site and DESPITE my posting on this issue dozens (or maybe hundreds) of times, folks get this wrong and need to understand....a retirement is a retirement. It is not an "Active Duty" retirement, and it is especially neither a "Active duty Disability Retirement" or a "Reserve Disability Retirement." Folks habitually want to lessen or increase the impact or importance of their component, status, or other distinction when analyzing or understanding the compensation or benefits (including retirement ceremonies) upon retirement. RETIRED=RETIRED. (I know I will be restating this again and again as people seem to not want to believe me; to an extent, this is understandable because so often, like the OP faced, some random Senior NCO or Officer will state something to the contrary....I can't account for stupid or willful ignorance of law and regulations).

(The law you are retired under will drive your compensation and how it is computed....years of service times 2.5%, disability rating multiplied by 2.5.% times years of service, or points for reservists retired for length of service).

Folks, please accept this as a baseline truth- RETIRED=RETIRED. There can be permutations and different outcomes for the retiree; but, as a 97% solution, what I wrote is the case.

Now, go get all you are due!!!
 

FloridaInjuredInCombat

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#6
Yes, it does....as a general point, EVERY RETIREE IS ENTITLED TO A CEREMONY.

Here are the Army/ARNG specific references:

"8–10. Retirement ceremony Army National Guard leadership will ensure all Soldiers have an opportunity to participate in an appropriate retirement ceremony and receive the standard Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Proram Package as outlined in paragraph 2–2. The Commander, IMCOM (para 1–4i) is not responsible for funding the Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program package to honor Soldiers retiring from the ARNG. All ARNG retirement applications need to indicate whether the retiree has received the commendation package, by attaching a generic memorandum indicating receipt of the package." AR 600-8-7.

"2–2. Principles of support The military personnel system will include a function to— a. Provide Soldiers, regardless of component, the opportunity to participate in an appropriate retirement ceremony as determined by the commander. b. Honor individual retiring Soldiers and their Families in recognition of careers of selfless service to the Army and nation, by issuing the standard Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package upon retirement.
(1) The Army Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package includes the following:
(a) Fully personalized, full-color letter signed by the Secretary of Army, Chief of Staff of the Army and Sergeant Major of the Army.
(b) Full-color box carrier.
(c) U.S. flag, measuring 3 by 5 feet, cotton outdoor (in accordance with Section 644, Public Law 105–261, or Section 652, PL 106–65).
(d) Retired Army pin, formerly known as the “U.S. Army Retired Lapel Button” (AR 600–8–22).
(e) Two-color window decal (Retired) (one large, two small).
(f) Army Strong DVD. (g) Packaging materials to allow all contents to arrive to retiring Soldier in superior condition.
(2) Retirement certificates (AR 635–5).
c. Assist Soldiers, Family members, and survivors following retirement.
d. Support the Army’s personnel life cycle function of transition."
AR 600-8-7

Note that I am not calling out or criticizing (at least not specifically) @FloridaInjuredInCombat for asking the question. (I am glad he did, because it offers a chance to re-emphasize a point).

BUT- Since the inception of this site and DESPITE my posting on this issue dozens (or maybe hundreds) of times, folks get this wrong and need to understand....a retirement is a retirement. It is not an "Active Duty" retirement, and it is especially neither a "Active duty Disability Retirement" or a "Reserve Disability Retirement." Folks habitually want to lessen or increase the impact or importance of their component, status, or other distinction when analyzing or understanding the compensation or benefits (including retirement ceremonies) upon retirement. RETIRED=RETIRED. (I know I will be restating this again and again as people seem to not want to believe me; to an extent, this is understandable because so often, like the OP faced, some random Senior NCO or Officer will state something to the contrary....I can't account for stupid or willful ignorance of law and regulations).

(The law you are retired under will drive your compensation and how it is computed....years of service times 2.5%, disability rating multiplied by 2.5.% times years of service, or points for reservists retired for length of service).

Folks, please accept this as a baseline truth- RETIRED=RETIRED. There can be permutations and different outcomes for the retiree; but, as a 97% solution, what I wrote is the case.

Now, go get all you are due!!!
Jason,

No offense taken. It really didn't occur to me that my unit would (or would have to) go to the "trouble" of a retirement ceremony. After the last 20 months or so of putting up with the fight I have had to put up with for the benefits I've been due, and the pointless animosity I've had to put up with along the way, part of me couldn't care less about a ceremony of any kind at this point.

On the other hand, I will request a proper retirement ceremony for two good reasons, the obvious one being it will drive the haters crazy, but just as importantly it will be an opportunity to get the word out that such things as INCAP do exist for injured Guardsmen. The unit and the Guard for that matter seems to want to keep that benefit unknown and unused by the injured Soldiers at a time when they need it the most.

It's been my observation that the Guard half asses a lot of stuff, especially when it comes to recognition. Case in point, when the unit I served with in Iraq was done with their deployment, they had a "medal ceremony" just before leaving the combat zone. The Officers and Senior Enlisted each were awarded a Bronze Star medal, complete with the award in the Army folder.

When it got time pass out awards to the lower Enlisted, we were each given a Xerox copy of the same ARCOM award form with our name hand written in the name block, no medal, no folder, but a curt explanation that someone neglected to order the awards in time, but "get one from supply when you get back to your unit". That was one hell of a gesture of appreciation considering that our small battalion of 300 had lost 19 killed in action and incurred over 80 wounded in action over the last year.

So given the track history of Guard Appreciation I'm not expecting much. Hell, who knows maybe they'll splurge for week old discounted Wal-mart cake!
 
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Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#7
I get, sometimes, frustrated with folks not recognizing the difference between right and wrong, what is due them, and what is required of the military. Way too often, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, and Coasties who are disabled get treated as "second class" members and are told they don't deserve respect, honor or dignity. It pisses me off and makes me point out that rank or position is not an "award" or some kind of "royal position." When I was a Company Commander, I told my entire Officer and NCO leadership that my rank and theirs' was not something that was there for our enjoyment- the entire point of rank and position was to aid in accomplishing the mission and that the most important point in the exercise of whatever rank held was to aid the real "workers" (meaning junior NCOs and enlisted folks) in doing what was required; the most important person in any organization is the actual "worker;" the leaders are only there to help them accomplish the needed job....and I would be pissed at anyone who failed to follow that point or take advantage of their rank to the detriment of accomplishing what was required. I relieved more than one NCO who thought rank was something that meant they could be just there to not do work and did not set their subordinates up for success (/rant off).

No offense taken. It really didn't occur to me that my unit would (or would have to) go to the "trouble" of a retirement ceremony. After the last 20 months or so of putting up with the fight I have had to put up with for the benefits I've been due, and the pointless animosity I've had to put up with along the way, part of me couldn't care less about a ceremony of any kind at this point.
I get that bolded point...but, like I alluded to before, it is not necessarily about you. Yes, the ceremony is meant to honor your service. But, in doing so, it also sends a message to others (most importantly, the subordinates) that the Nation and the Army honors service rendered. I piss (unfortunately, only figuratively) on the Command team that does not understand this and fails to honor the service of Soldiers who have earned it.

On the other hand, I will request a proper retirement ceremony for two good reasons, the obvious one being it will drive the haters crazy, but just as importantly it will be an opportunity to get the word out that such things as INCAP do exist for injured Guardsmen. The unit and the Guard for that matter seems to want to keep that benefit unknown and unused by the injured Soldiers at a time when they need it the most.
I agree with the above....with the exception (even to what I stated earlier), that you have earned your retirement and you are due the respect and dignity that comes with it. Be proud, both for yourself, but also for the example you set for the young Private who does not know better. The example you set will carry forward. Do what is right.

It's been my observation that the Guard half asses a lot of stuff, especially when it comes to recognition. Case in point, when the unit I served with in Iraq was done with their deployment, they had a "medal ceremony" just before leaving the combat zone. The Officers and Senior Enlisted each were awarded a Bronze Star medal, complete with the award in the Army folder.
Yes!!

And, here is another anecdote....I had a Soldier who did well deployed, and came to me and told me he did not want his ARCOM, which was to be awarded to him and about 35 other Soldiers in a mass ceremony. He was pissed about a lot of things (some, maybe most, valid). I told him that he needed to forget about himself, that the medal was only partially about him, but instead, was a part of motivating others and that he should put his feelings aside (and that HE WOULD be in formation and receive it). (I am not sure that was the 100% right answer as to him....but, I think it was the right "Army answer," and at the end of the day, he did receive it in formation). Personally, I never got a lot of awards of medals (though, I think I have 3-4 ARCOM's myself...I saw to it that my 1SG got an MSM for the same period of service we served together, but, to be honest, I could give a damn about awards or medals....less so now...Bronze Stars with V devices matter in my opinion....Silver Stars are a HUGE Deal....had the honor of serving in the same command with a MOH awardee, that was really cool, and of course, that medal means more than can be stated).

Anyway, the point is that I think it is great to push for a retirement ceremony when due. Both for the personal honor you have earned, but also to send a message (more importantly to others who might be due the honors, and to the Command that they must accord retirees respect).

That is my .2 cents.
 
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USAFRet92010

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#9
When I was medically retired, I was not given a retirement ceremony. I knew that I was authorized it but no one even asked if I wanted one. After I retired, I received a US Flag, Retirement Pin, along with Retirement Certificate for my wife and I. That just goes to show you just how some units treat their people. After I had all of my injuries, everyone avoided me and I was treated as a second class citizen. They were on my back on a daily basis. They even went so far as accusing me of stealing one on the units laptop computers. I said you must be crazy, what good would it do me since I do no know any of the passwords. Right after that I told my Peblo to move up my retirement date by 30 days before they dream up some other scheme.
 

EODStew44

Registered Member
#10
When I was medically retired, I was not given a retirement ceremony. I knew that I was authorized it but no one even asked if I wanted one. After I retired, I received a US Flag, Retirement Pin, along with Retirement Certificate for my wife and I. That just goes to show you just how some units treat their people. After I had all of my injuries, everyone avoided me and I was treated as a second class citizen. They were on my back on a daily basis. They even went so far as accusing me of stealing one on the units laptop computers. I said you must be crazy, what good would it do me since I do no know any of the passwords. Right after that I told my Peblo to move up my retirement date by 30 days before they dream up some other scheme.

I just found this post after I received my Retirement Certificate. Basically, I was put on TDRL in 2013, then finally placed on PDRL 2015. I got a Retirement Certificate and Retirement Orders in the mail... however, I was under the impression I was supposed to receive the "Retirement Packet" I.E. Flag, box, lapel pin, etc. If I am wrong let me know.

The only reason I ask is because we are about to relocate, and I do not want them to send the packet to my current apartment, when I will be living in a home somewhere else. People are scandalous, and would probably take the package.

Anyone know if you still get the packet? If so, and I have not yet received it... whom can I contact? I want to fly the colors!
 

Camp P Marine

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#11
USMC MARCORPSEPMAN states:

"1012. RETIREMENT CEREMONY *1. An appropriate retirement ceremony is to be held within the capabilities of the command for Marines retiring (includes transfer to the FMCR, TDRL, and PDRL)."
 

FloridaInjuredInCombat

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#12
I just found this post after I received my Retirement Certificate. Basically, I was put on TDRL in 2013, then finally placed on PDRL 2015. I got a Retirement Certificate and Retirement Orders in the mail... however, I was under the impression I was supposed to receive the "Retirement Packet" I.E. Flag, box, lapel pin, etc. If I am wrong let me know.

The only reason I ask is because we are about to relocate, and I do not want them to send the packet to my current apartment, when I will be living in a home somewhere else. People are scandalous, and would probably take the package.

Anyone know if you still get the packet? If so, and I have not yet received it... whom can I contact? I want to fly the colors!
You can look up the RSO - Retirement Service Officer for your area, and request the
"Retiring Soldier Commendation Program Package" that's the flag, pin, in a not too fancy cardboard box. I don't believe you get a wooden presentation box. Let them know you are moving and have it sent to your new address. Just tell them you didn't receive it when you discharged.

This is the link to the Army RSO / Soldier for Life page
http://soldierforlife.army.mil/retirement/
Down the left side is the RSO contact lookup by area

My guess is each service has roughly the same thing if you're from another branch.

Hope this helps...
 

triedandfailed

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#13
Everything at the tail end was rushed, and I don't know if a full on ceremony (ie: formation) was ever offered. The Same Platoon SGT that stood up for my husband at his formal board put together a really nice collage (with flag) and presented it to him at a mandatory Christmas party before his official retirement. That was a way better tribute than any formation ceremony would have been and I am very grateful for him and his dedication to my husband.

We also received the cardboard box after retirement.

If the Command Team had been difficult about everything, I think I would have insisted on a formation just for spite LOL but thankfully we got a really nice memory instead.

You deserve recognition for your service. Don't let anyone - even yourself - cheat you out of that. If not for you, think of what a treasure it will be for your grandchildren some long time from now.
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#14
Dear fellow PEB members.

I have a quick question. When you get your results from your medical evaluation board and it comes back 50% DOD in 100% VA do are you eligible for a retirement ceremony, A flag flown wherever you want him to be flown, and basically everything as if I'm retiring after 20 years of service. I have been in for 15 years nowand when I got my findings back of 50% DOD and 100% VA my Command Master Cheifd said that I couldn't get that but my Pablo said I was entitled to everything. Where can I find this instruction this way I could show my CMCthat it can happen?

Thank you guys and gals so much advance.

AD2 (AW) Wall, W.C.
Welcome to the PEB Forum! :)

Indeed, it's your legal right as all others have stated above! Now, do the right thing and go fight for it! ;)

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

RonG

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#15
I just saw this thread that started several years ago. I am glad Jason Perry pointed out that a retirement is a retirement and one type is not more important than another.

I did not have a retirement in conjunction with leaving the Army in 1991 with > 20 AD. I had been in Germany and I was scheduled to be out processed at Ft Jackson, SC where I knew no one. I suppose I could have requested a retirement ceremony in Germany, but the Desert Storm operation (Gulf War) had just ended and things were somewhat hectic. My spouse and son had already departed for CONUS, so I did not pursue it.

I found this quotation apt and familiar as I have long said the same (in essence), "I could give a damn about awards or medals....less so now...Bronze Stars with V devices matter in my opinion....Silver Stars are a HUGE Deal....had the honor of serving in the same command with a MOH awardee, that was really cool, and of course, that medal means more than can be stated). " I believe that was one of Jason Perry's remarks. I was fortunate to receive an award that is higher in precedence than the Bronze Star. However, I have often said that any award for Valor ("V" device on medal/ribbon) is higher than any award for merit. Of course, that is just my opinion, but many of my former peers agree with me.

I never served with a MOH recipient, but it would have been a great honor to do so.

Ron
 
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hmv88

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#16
I was just told by MSC my retirement awards are done. My unit is having a ceremony on the 23rd for a couple of us. Only took them a little over a year to get my awards completed Lol!
 
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