22 Year Retirement vs MEB retirement

JarrodSki

Registered Member
#1
Hello all,
I've read through the posts in the past and the answers I'm searching for are about as clear as mud.

I'm a CW3 active duty soldier with 21 years and 4 months active time. At one of my recent medical visits the Dr. offered to start a MED board on me. I've talked to numerous people (PEBLO, numerous VA reps) and no one has given me an answer that I'm confident with. Everyone has suggested that the MEB route is better but no one has given me a solid reason why, except for the fact that I'll have the VA rating before I retire.

The numerous VA reps that I have spoken with are all pretty confident that I will get 100% P&T. I have spinal stenosis, 2 bulging discs, sleep apnea, gout with medication, Knee surgery x2 with ongoing pain, plantar fasciitis both feet, PTSD, IBS Irritable bowel, depression (on meds), Reoccurring elbow pain, trigger finger, loss of smell and a few other issues.

Besides having my medical appointments scheduled for me and my VA rating before I retire what is the benefit of going through a med board? If I qualify for 100% VA P&T what would the benefit of a medical retirement be?

If anyone could point me in the direction of regulations on this I would greatly appreciate it.
 

golfrnut

Registered Member
#2
Your potential retirement percentage that determines what your retirement payments are could be higher depending upon what you are found unfit for? That’s the only real difference I can think of.
 

RonG

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#3
Here are a few considerations (among several):
--21.33 years x 2.5% = 53.3% multiplier for regular retirement
--DoD disability retirement percentage unknown (75% maximum) = unknown multiplier for disability retirement
--Average of high 36 months base pay x 53.3% = regular retired pay
--DoD disability reitirement percentage x average of high 36 months base pay = DoD disability retired pay. You get to choose the higher of the regular retirement or the disability retirement rates.

1. Regular retirement: If you are rated by the VA at 50% or more, you will receive all your retired pay and also your VA compensation. Some or all of the retired pay will be CRDP (which is retired pay itself).
2. Medical retirement: You will waive retired pay dollar for dollar in the amount of VA compensation received. You will also receive VA compensation. If you also qualify for CRDP (if 50% or more for VA), CRDP will restore the dollar amount of the waived retired pay not to exceed the retired pay you would receive in regular retirement. Any residual retired pay remaining after the waiver will reduce the CRDP amount. CRDP does not restore waived DoD disability pay.

There are other factors regarding the two retirement systems not discussed here.

Good luck,
Ron
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#4
Hello all,
I've read through the posts in the past and the answers I'm searching for are about as clear as mud.

I'm a CW3 active duty soldier with 21 years and 4 months active time. At one of my recent medical visits the Dr. offered to start a MED board on me. I've talked to numerous people (PEBLO, numerous VA reps) and no one has given me an answer that I'm confident with. Everyone has suggested that the MEB route is better but no one has given me a solid reason why, except for the fact that I'll have the VA rating before I retire.

The numerous VA reps that I have spoken with are all pretty confident that I will get 100% P&T. I have spinal stenosis, 2 bulging discs, sleep apnea, gout with medication, Knee surgery x2 with ongoing pain, plantar fasciitis both feet, PTSD, IBS Irritable bowel, depression (on meds), Reoccurring elbow pain, trigger finger, loss of smell and a few other issues.

Besides having my medical appointments scheduled for me and my VA rating before I retire what is the benefit of going through a med board? If I qualify for 100% VA P&T what would the benefit of a medical retirement be?

If anyone could point me in the direction of regulations on this I would greatly appreciate it.
Welcome to the PEB Forum! :)

In addition to everything written above...

From my experiences via an U.S. Army perspective when in the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process, the MEB is initially reviewed by the informal PEB (IPEB). The IPEB decision will include written justification supporting a Fit or Unfit finding for each of your medical conditions, and if your condition(s) is(are) combat-related and/or incurred in a combat zone. The IPEB will also determine all of the following for any unfit conditions:

- If your military unfitting injury or illness occurred while in the line of duty (not as a result of misconduct) and whether you are entitled to benefits
- If your condition existed prior to joining the military [Existed Prior to Service (EPTS)] and whether it has been permanently aggravated by military service
- If you complied with the recommended medical treatment
- If your condition is permanent and/or stable

Also, the PEB shall make determinations for all of the following:

- Fitness or unfitness to continue military service
- Eligibility for disability compensation
- Disability codes and percentage rating (only for non-IDES cases)
- Disposition of the case
- Whether or not the injury or illness meets combat-related criteria to qualify for additional tax, employment, or other benefits

If applicable to your individual specific military situation while in the DoD IDES process, a combat-related determination by the IDES PEB will result in a federal income tax withholding (FITW) exclusion (e.g., an exemption from the mandatory payment of federal income taxes) from your military medical retirement pay. Indeed, this is definitely a significant cost savings of personal income for the immediate family while coupled with a DFAS CRDP entitlement (if applicable) as currently received with my own military medical retirement.

Moreover, any future submission of a DFAS CRSC application (if applicable) would not immediately be required since the FITW exclusion would already be in effect via a DFAS CRDP entitlement (if applicable). Take care and enjoy your forthcoming military retirement; whether length of service (LOS) or medical!

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer!"

Best Wishes!
 
#5
I went through the same process. I went through the MEB/PEB process, was found unfit and submitted a waiver to the PEB and requested retirement. The positive is that my va claim is fast tracked bc it is part of the IDES process and I left with a traditional retirement on top of that.
 

jimreddog2000

Registered Member
#6
anyone to help me with crsc my peblo just call Dfas to see if I qualify, ive made it all the way to peb formal board where they said shoulder and back are v1/3 combat related and I asked peblo about it and was told to call dfas
 

RonG

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#7
The following websites provide in detail discussions about CRSC; the form required; application procedures; evidence required; and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs):

CRSC Information

DFAS: https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/disability/crsc.html

Army: https://www.hrc.army.mil/content/CRSC

Air Force: http://www.afpc.af.mil/Combat-Related-Special-Compensation

Navy/USMC:
http://www.secnav.navy.mil/mra/CORB/Pages/CRSCB/default.aspx

USCG: https://www.uscg.mil/ppc/ras/CRDP-CRSC-News.asp

CRSC for CH 61 retirees with less than 20 years for active duty retirement or without all the requirements for reserve retirement, including the age requirement, will receive CRSC as follows:

Combat Related Special Compensation for Chapter 61 (disability) retirees is the lesser of


--a. the dollar amount of the longevity portion of the DoD retired pay

or

--b. the dollar amount of VA compensation for combat related disabilities. (Approved percentage mirrors the rates found in the VA compensation tables.)

Note: Active duty time is used to determine the longevity portion. Reservists can use their total career retired points and divide by 360 to determine the active duty equivalent factor. Also, AD TERA retirees are considered the same as 20 year AD retirees.



Ron
 
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