Resource icon

A Practical Guide to Conducting VA Compensation and Pension Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorder 2014-09-28

No permission to download

Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#1
Jason Perry submitted a new resource:

A Practical Guide to Conducting VA Compensation and Pension Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorder - A Practical Guide to Conducting VA C&P Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorders

This is a scholarly article titled, "A Practical Guide to Conducting VA Compensation and Pension Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorders."

There are many great points in this article. However, understand that this is not a statute, regulation, or primary source of law. It is a scholarly article covering issues with mental health exams conducted for VA compensation purposes.
Read more about this resource...
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#2
Jason Perry submitted a new resource:
A Practical Guide to Conducting VA Compensation and Pension Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorder - A Practical Guide to Conducting VA C&P Exams for PTSD and Other Mental Disorders
Read more about this resource...
Indeed, it's a good scholarly article with numerous great points of fact and opinion...a must read! :cool:

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

scoutCC

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#3
I'm curious how relevant this is given the 2012 JBLM thingy that basically said forensic psychiatry isn't suitable. Things like the MENT I find pretty shady. I personally think the control group and test group setup is suspect. I don't think the idea of false negatives isn't factored in much. Not to mention that it basically amounts to the psychiatrist setting himself up as a human lie detector, which is deeply problematic.

I think the discussion about under reporting and symptom hiding is far more interesting than malingering. I think the 10-30% diagnosis rate of PTSD is strange, mainly based off my personal discussions with others Soldiers.

I don't agree with many aspects of PTSD as approached by psychiatry. I personally believe anyone who left the wire everyday comes back on a spectrum of PTSD symptoms, and quite a few who didn't leave the wire. The idea behind the stressor is strange and arbitrary. Most I know don't have a single event that bothers them, but a multitude slowly building up. I liked Hackworth's ideas about the mind being like a cup. Every time we experience the craziness, we're filling up our cup a little bit. Hackworth said we all have different size cups, and if given enough time and experiences, everyone will eventually fill it up and it will overflow. He basically said PTSD is when the cup overflows, but I think that's just the PTSD that freaks us out. I believe many PTSD symptoms are experienced and change us just by the process of filling the cup. Most just choose to hide it, ignore it, or discount those symptoms unless we're in an overflow state and no longer can. /shrug, so says me. I wish the DSM-V had opted to change it to an injury instead of a disorder as the military suggested, but for accuracy reasons, not so more SMs would seek help.

I could continue to complain about psychiatry and this condition, but I already feel like I'm rambling, despite reading this a few days ago and stewing a bit over it.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#4
scoutCC

10-30% sounds right to me when you consider the 3:1 logistics tail to tooth of today's military forces. I have had units that exceeded 30%, but they were precision engagement forces with high engagement rates with enemy forces.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#5
The article provides a detailed and footnoted account of the professional engagement necessary to conduct an adequate assessment that meets the VA's standards and the standards of care required by the state board of examiners. The article also provides the practitioner practical assistance, such as a patient-provider agreement for C&P exams, definitions of various standards of evidence, and samples of forensically oriented reports.
 
data-matched-content-ui-type="image_stacked" data-matched-content-rows-num="3" data-matched-content-columns-num="1" data-ad-format="autorelaxed">
Top