Anyone have some examples of support letters

Jason Perry

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Support for what? For what agency (DoD, or VA)?

Bottom line, it is hard to provide "templates" or examples without knowing the purpose for the letter (i.e., what are you trying to demonstrate/provide evidence of...are you trying to show unfitness? Entitlement to a particular rating? Combat related nature of the disability)?

A note of caution. A general rule that I espouse is that you don't submit something without a purpose. A follow up is that I routinely see cases where members hurt their cases by submitting ill considered "evidence" or documentation. I would not venture a guess about your situation without knowing a lot more.
 

Karensgt70

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Would you happen to have an example of a statement from a commander verifying that a military member had an injury coming back from their deployment?
 

Jason Perry

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Would you happen to have an example of a statement from a commander verifying that a military member had an injury coming back from their deployment?
No, I don't have an example that I could provide (I have drafted and seen many of these, but, I can't provide them here as they would be attorney work product.)

However, it would not be difficult to state what would be ideal or at least helpful in such a statement.

Written as either a Memorandum for Record or a statement addressed to whatever board (MEB or PEB), I think a helpful letter would state these elements:

1) An introductory statement. Something that states the commander's relationship to the person. An example would be, "SrA Jones has been a member of my command since [DATE]. and [she/he] deployed with my unit to [location] from [inclusive dates]. An extra helpful statement would include something like (if applicable), "SrA Jones had no previous issues or disabilities prior to her deployment."
2) A statement regarding the facts and circumstances of the injury. An example would be, "SrA Jones was injured during combatives training on or about [DATE]. [She/he] reported the injury and went to the [healthcare provider site, maybe BAS, maybe Troop Medical Clinic, maybe unit medic] and was [returned to duty with or without restrictions/was placed on limited duty/was given duty restrictions].
3) A statement as to ultimate opinion and conclusion. An example would be, "Based on the fact that SrA Jones was injured on [DATE] while deployed [and, as applicable, "and did not have any previous problems or issues with STATE CONDITION OR DISABILITY,] I find that [his/her] condition was caused by the [EVENT cited in para. 2, above] and was incurred and/or aggravated in the line of duty.
4) As a matter of course, a point of contact for the commander or other officials regarding the memo.

Further thoughts. There should be no need for the above type of memo because the military has a system to address this issue. It is called the Line of Duty Determination, and going through that should resolve the issue. Now, I know that it is not unusual for units to not perform LOD's when required. But, I also point out that the LOD process provides additional rights. The preferred method would be to have the commander (who seems inclined to help) to initiate or push for an LOD. (That is an additional issue as to how to do that and when the commander can trigger or make that happen.)
 
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