Could use some help/guidance on if I would qualify for CRSC: don't know what to do

Calans

Well-Known Member
Registered Member
Hi all,
I'm AD Air Force and am coming up on 18 years in Nov. I have some significant diagnoses that prevent me from effectively doing my job. I'm the senior person in my unit, so no one really knows the extent. Docs said as long as the commander doesn't ask about a med board for me, they are ok with making me non-deployable and continuing to try meds and make specialty appointments.

What I'm trying to figure out is if I can stick it out for the next 2 years to maximize retirement and VA benefits. I don't want to make it all about money, but it is part of the equation. I'm worried that I won't qualify for CRSC. If I do qualify, it's my understanding that would make up the difference.

I've had a couple of deployments, the most significant being to Iraq in Fall - Winter of 07-08.
I have the GWOT service and AF Expeditionary Ribbon with Gold border.
My LOEs and OPRs have captured the significant data such as combat wounded, combat ops support, etc.
I'm a chaplain and worked as the litter carrier and EMEDS chaplain at a forward operating base. I've had exposure to deaths and dying, EPWs, trauma, counseled sexual assault victims, etc. etc. Basically the horrors of war and if you're here, you probably know what I'm talking about.

My diagnoses which I think are qualifying are:
PTSD
Fibromyalgia
Sleep Apnea
Chronic Pain
Chronic Fatigue
Tinnitus
Asymmetric hearing loss
Insomnia
Asthma (mild)
Exercise-induced bronchospasm
Other respiratory conditions due to chemicals, gases, fumes and vapors (from Tricare Online Problem list)
Compassion fatigue
Possibly: GERD,

There's actually some more, but I don't know that they would be qualifying. (I know, I'm falling apart.)

The main problem I'm having is no one will talk to me unless the MEB process has startred. My RILOS for asthma come back with an ok to continue service. Physically I've been on a profile and haven't had more than a waist measurement done in years. I've tried all the VA help people, asked some official AF people, etc. They all say the same thing... talk to us when the process has started.

How do I get a read on where I'm at to make an informed decision? I've done the VA calculator and it looks like with those diagnoses alone, not including my others (Spinal stenosis, shoulder/rotator cuff issues, herniated discs, knees, etc.) I'm probably at 100%

I'm worried about how well I'll do over the next couple years. it seems my health and well-being, along with my ability to care for others gets worse and worse. At the same time if I don't stick it out over the next couple years that could mean about $30k per year for the next 30 years or so? That's a huge chunk to visit grand-kids, quality of life, etc.

It looks like CRSC could fill in the gap and give me some peace of mind, but I've also heard the Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC? I kept a journal while in Iraq so I have the exact dates of every direct and indirect fire, EMEDS all, alarm red, etc.

Thanks in advance for helping me figure this out.
 

Makarov

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Registered Member
I’m an E-5 diver and I had the same trouble with my treatment making me NPQ. Basically it’s between you, your command, and your doctors. MEB only occurs if they have a medical opinion that determines your condition(s) are unfitting AND that you will not be able to be fit within 12 months. My docs talked to me and gave me treatment options that allowed me to continue diving, as the treatment was the disqualifying factor not the injury itself. As long as you don’t have to med waive multiple PRT’s and your treatment doesn’t interfere with your job, there shouldn’t be an issue making it to your 20.

As for CRSC, the conditions you have, the locations you deployed, and the medals you earned arent huge factors in the CRSC decision, based on what I read in the instruction. The injury has to be caused by an armed conflict with an enemy force, an instrument of war, simulated war (high risk training), or during extreme hazardous duty (diving, demolition, flight, jump, etc.).
That being said, there are things you can use as evidence to support your CRSC claim. Things like combat medals, medical records directly tying your injury to a qualifying event, buddy letters, etc. the GWOT service/expeditionary medal does not count as a combat medal. I’ll look for the list of accepted medals so I can link it to you. As @RonG says, you might as well push a package for it because the worst they can tell you is no. Good luck, sir!
 

Makarov

Active Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Hi all,
I'm AD Air Force and am coming up on 18 years in Nov. I have some significant diagnoses that prevent me from effectively doing my job. I'm the senior person in my unit, so no one really knows the extent. Docs said as long as the commander doesn't ask about a med board for me, they are ok with making me non-deployable and continuing to try meds and make specialty appointments.

What I'm trying to figure out is if I can stick it out for the next 2 years to maximize retirement and VA benefits. I don't want to make it all about money, but it is part of the equation. I'm worried that I won't qualify for CRSC. If I do qualify, it's my understanding that would make up the difference.

I've had a couple of deployments, the most significant being to Iraq in Fall - Winter of 07-08.
I have the GWOT service and AF Expeditionary Ribbon with Gold border.
My LOEs and OPRs have captured the significant data such as combat wounded, combat ops support, etc.
I'm a chaplain and worked as the litter carrier and EMEDS chaplain at a forward operating base. I've had exposure to deaths and dying, EPWs, trauma, counseled sexual assault victims, etc. etc. Basically the horrors of war and if you're here, you probably know what I'm talking about.

My diagnoses which I think are qualifying are:
PTSD
Fibromyalgia
Sleep Apnea
Chronic Pain
Chronic Fatigue
Tinnitus
Asymmetric hearing loss
Insomnia
Asthma (mild)
Exercise-induced bronchospasm
Other respiratory conditions due to chemicals, gases, fumes and vapors (from Tricare Online Problem list)
Compassion fatigue
Possibly: GERD,

There's actually some more, but I don't know that they would be qualifying. (I know, I'm falling apart.)

The main problem I'm having is no one will talk to me unless the MEB process has startred. My RILOS for asthma come back with an ok to continue service. Physically I've been on a profile and haven't had more than a waist measurement done in years. I've tried all the VA help people, asked some official AF people, etc. They all say the same thing... talk to us when the process has started.

How do I get a read on where I'm at to make an informed decision? I've done the VA calculator and it looks like with those diagnoses alone, not including my others (Spinal stenosis, shoulder/rotator cuff issues, herniated discs, knees, etc.) I'm probably at 100%

I'm worried about how well I'll do over the next couple years. it seems my health and well-being, along with my ability to care for others gets worse and worse. At the same time if I don't stick it out over the next couple years that could mean about $30k per year for the next 30 years or so? That's a huge chunk to visit grand-kids, quality of life, etc.

It looks like CRSC could fill in the gap and give me some peace of mind, but I've also heard the Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC? I kept a journal while in Iraq so I have the exact dates of every direct and indirect fire, EMEDS all, alarm red, etc.

Thanks in advance for helping me figure this out.
It’s 100% your choice if you want to stay in or not. If you push back enough, you can definitely delay the process long enough to make it to your 20. But unless you are on LIMDU, you may be limited on your treatment options. If you think your health won’t be negatively impacted too much then go for 20. If you think it’s just too bad to function, then talk to your doc about it. Either way, I think you’re close enough to your 20 that you could make it to 20. But that’s the Doc’s decision really. Just tell doc what you want.
 

Provis

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Another possibility is to seek treatment outside of the military. There might be some resources on the civilian side that can help you limp along without involving your unit if you wish to keep it quite until you can retire.
 

RonG

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It looks like CRSC could fill in the gap and give me some peace of mind, but I've also heard the Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC? I kept a journal while in Iraq so I have the exact dates of every direct and indirect fire, EMEDS all, alarm red, etc.

Thanks in advance for helping me figure this out.
Hello @Calans

The "Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC"? That sounds like someone who knows little about CRSC has offered his opinion on the matter.
The history of Concurrent Receipt is at https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R40589.pdf <---LINK

I don't remember if we have had a CRSC discussion previously, but here is a collection of CRSC information, including links to each of the services CRSC web page.
A Supplement to CRSC Information <---LINK

CRSC for Chapter 61 retirees with less than 20 years service generally is the LESSER of
--the longevity portion of one's retired pay
or
--the CRSC amount approved by the service...found in the VA compensation tables (for rates)

There are other factors in the computation of CRSC.

I don't predict approvals/denials but a well-documented application enhances one's chances of approval.

Good luck,
Ron

edited to add: If you are able to retire with a regular retirement (20 yr AD) and have a VA rating of 50% or more, you will be eligible for CRDP which restores the longevity portion of retired pay for all service connected conditions.
 

Makarov

Active Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Hi all,
I'm AD Air Force and am coming up on 18 years in Nov. I have some significant diagnoses that prevent me from effectively doing my job. I'm the senior person in my unit, so no one really knows the extent. Docs said as long as the commander doesn't ask about a med board for me, they are ok with making me non-deployable and continuing to try meds and make specialty appointments.

What I'm trying to figure out is if I can stick it out for the next 2 years to maximize retirement and VA benefits. I don't want to make it all about money, but it is part of the equation. I'm worried that I won't qualify for CRSC. If I do qualify, it's my understanding that would make up the difference.

I've had a couple of deployments, the most significant being to Iraq in Fall - Winter of 07-08.
I have the GWOT service and AF Expeditionary Ribbon with Gold border.
My LOEs and OPRs have captured the significant data such as combat wounded, combat ops support, etc.
I'm a chaplain and worked as the litter carrier and EMEDS chaplain at a forward operating base. I've had exposure to deaths and dying, EPWs, trauma, counseled sexual assault victims, etc. etc. Basically the horrors of war and if you're here, you probably know what I'm talking about.

My diagnoses which I think are qualifying are:
PTSD
Fibromyalgia
Sleep Apnea
Chronic Pain
Chronic Fatigue
Tinnitus
Asymmetric hearing loss
Insomnia
Asthma (mild)
Exercise-induced bronchospasm
Other respiratory conditions due to chemicals, gases, fumes and vapors (from Tricare Online Problem list)
Compassion fatigue
Possibly: GERD,

There's actually some more, but I don't know that they would be qualifying. (I know, I'm falling apart.)

The main problem I'm having is no one will talk to me unless the MEB process has startred. My RILOS for asthma come back with an ok to continue service. Physically I've been on a profile and haven't had more than a waist measurement done in years. I've tried all the VA help people, asked some official AF people, etc. They all say the same thing... talk to us when the process has started.

How do I get a read on where I'm at to make an informed decision? I've done the VA calculator and it looks like with those diagnoses alone, not including my others (Spinal stenosis, shoulder/rotator cuff issues, herniated discs, knees, etc.) I'm probably at 100%

I'm worried about how well I'll do over the next couple years. it seems my health and well-being, along with my ability to care for others gets worse and worse. At the same time if I don't stick it out over the next couple years that could mean about $30k per year for the next 30 years or so? That's a huge chunk to visit grand-kids, quality of life, etc.

It looks like CRSC could fill in the gap and give me some peace of mind, but I've also heard the Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC? I kept a journal while in Iraq so I have the exact dates of every direct and indirect fire, EMEDS all, alarm red, etc.

Thanks in advance for helping me figure this out.
Also your problem list is a bit inflated for how the VA will look at it, IMO. A lot of these issues are the same just in different severities or conditions. The VA does not pyramid conditions. They will lump them together and give you one rating based on the severity.
For example:

your list is:
1) PTSD
2) Fibromyalgia
3) Sleep Apnea
4) Chronic Pain
5) Chronic Fatigue
6) Tinnitus
7) Asymmetric hearing loss
8) Insomnia
9) Asthma (mild)
10) Exercise-induced bronchospasm
11) Other respiratory conditions due to chemicals, gases, fumes and vapors (from Tricare Online Problem list)
Compassion fatigue
12) Possibly: GERD

in reality, the VA will compile the list something like this:

1) PTSD/Chronic/Compassion Fatigue/Insomnia rated
2) Asthma/Sleep Apnea/Exercise-induced bronchospasm rated
3) Fibromyalgia rated
4) Tinnitus/Asymmetric hearing loss rated
5) Gerd rated (gerd is commonly caused by chronic use of NSAIDS over the counters like Tylenol)

As for the other respiratory issues, you will need actual diagnoses from your doctor and there will need to be evidence that they are separate issues from you asthma and not just several resulting diagnosable airway issues caused by the same root problem with similar symptoms. Already the VA will add asthma and sleep apnea, although this is a common issue and some people fight it and get it changed to two different ratings.
Good luck!
 

Calans

Well-Known Member
Registered Member
Thanks for the replies so far. I really appreciate it.
Yeah, I guess that's where I'm at. Do I try and tough it out for another couple of years at the expense of my health or do I make self-care a priority. I just turned 50 so am not getting any younger. Chaps already have the oldest personnel, on average in the military.
For CRSC, the Fibro is a presumptive condition?
The PTSD is from the deployment, the sleep apnea and insomnia the sleep doc and psych said was secondary to the PTSD

But there's no real way to know if those qualify for CRSC until I'm actually at the board? For me, I'd like to make sure it'd be qualifying before the board to help me in my decision making. From everything I've read, there's a pretty big difference in pay in a medical retirement between crsc and no crsc?
 

RonG

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IF you complete 20 years AD and retire AND have a 50% or more VA disability, you can receive CRDP which causes the receipt of ALL the longevity portion of the retired pay.
(I am assuming a CH 61 retirement here but also qualify for a regular retirement of 20 yrs +).

Those disabilities could be just service connected...do not require combat related.

DFAS: Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay (CRDP)

Concurrent Retirement and Disability Pay (CRDP) allows military retirees to receive both military retired pay and Veterans Affairs (VA) compensation. This was prohibited until the CRDP program began on January 1, 2004.

CRDP is a "phase in" of benefits that gradually restores a retiree's VA disability offset. This means that an eligible retiree's retired pay will gradually increase each year until the phase in is complete effective January 2014.

You do not need to apply for CRDP. If qualified, you will be enrolled automatically.

Eligibility
You must be eligible for retired pay to qualify for CRDP. If you were placed on a disability retirement, but would be eligible for military retired pay in the absence of the disability, you may be entitled to receive CRDP.

Under these rules, you may be entitled to CRDP if…

  • you are a regular retiree with a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater.
  • you are a reserve retiree with 20 qualifying years of service, who has a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater and who has reached retirement age. (In most cases the retirement age for reservists is 60, but certain reserve retirees may be eligible before they turn 60. If you are a member of the Ready Reserve, your retirement age can be reduced below age 60 by three months for each 90 days of active service you have performed during a fiscal year.)
  • you are retired under Temporary Early Retirement Act (TERA) and have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater.
  • you are a disability retiree who earned entitlement to retired pay under any provision of law other than solely by disability, and you have a VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater. You might become eligible for CRDP at the time you would have become eligible for retired pay.

Ron
 

Calans

Well-Known Member
Registered Member
But at 18 years going in to a MEB for a chapter 21 retirement, is there anyway to know in advance of the board ratings and eligibility for CRSC? From what I gather, someone, at some point, in the VA decides what part of the disability results from combat, but that has no bearing on the AF board? And the AF board doesn't meet to consider CRSC until you're already medically retired?
 

RonG

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But at 18 years going in to a MEB for a chapter 21 retirement, is there anyway to know in advance of the board ratings and eligibility for CRSC? From what I gather, someone, at some point, in the VA decides what part of the disability results from combat, but that has no bearing on the AF board? And the AF board doesn't meet to consider CRSC until you're already medically retired?
The CRSC board of which you speak is not staffed with the same people who make your discharge decisions. It is a separate element.

The CRSC board will not consider an application until the member is in a retired status...this pertains to all the uniformed services. As you probably determined from reading the referenced material I provided, the VA rating documents (award document, etc.) is one of the most important elements in a CRSC evaluation.
A Supplement to CRSC Information <---LINK

I know little about PEB/MEB issues; I had a regular retirement in 1991. @chaplaincharlie might be of help.

I can offer this: No one will be able to guarantee your disabilities will be approved for CRSC.

Good luck,
Ron
 

oddpedestrian

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The reason why the AF dosent grant CRSC claims is because most of them are meritless. Some of the denied claims posted on this board alone included "I saw pictures of dead people" "I was stationed in Kuwait and heard bombs and knew people were dying" and they appealed appealed and appealed always denied I only actually see AF CRSC claims from their special forces unit, EOD, and security forces divisions. As a Chaplain I believe you did not carry a weapon in theater and had an escort correct? That means no engaging in direct enemy combat. When the VA grants your PTSD claim they are allowed to do it under the DSM IV criteria of "fear of military and hostile activity" the CRSC boards for PTSD claims follow DSM V and that requires what we call a "stressor event." When you mention direct and indirect fire scenarios you have to very specific about what your role was during the event not after. So going out and getting an injured soldier while still under fire is something they would be looking for.
 

chaplaincharlie

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Hi all,
I'm AD Air Force and am coming up on 18 years in Nov. I have some significant diagnoses that prevent me from effectively doing my job. I'm the senior person in my unit, so no one really knows the extent. Docs said as long as the commander doesn't ask about a med board for me, they are ok with making me non-deployable and continuing to try meds and make specialty appointments.

What I'm trying to figure out is if I can stick it out for the next 2 years to maximize retirement and VA benefits. I don't want to make it all about money, but it is part of the equation. I'm worried that I won't qualify for CRSC. If I do qualify, it's my understanding that would make up the difference.

I've had a couple of deployments, the most significant being to Iraq in Fall - Winter of 07-08.
I have the GWOT service and AF Expeditionary Ribbon with Gold border.
My LOEs and OPRs have captured the significant data such as combat wounded, combat ops support, etc.
I'm a chaplain and worked as the litter carrier and EMEDS chaplain at a forward operating base. I've had exposure to deaths and dying, EPWs, trauma, counseled sexual assault victims, etc. etc. Basically the horrors of war and if you're here, you probably know what I'm talking about.

My diagnoses which I think are qualifying are:
PTSD
Fibromyalgia
Sleep Apnea
Chronic Pain
Chronic Fatigue
Tinnitus
Asymmetric hearing loss
Insomnia
Asthma (mild)
Exercise-induced bronchospasm
Other respiratory conditions due to chemicals, gases, fumes and vapors (from Tricare Online Problem list)
Compassion fatigue
Possibly: GERD,

There's actually some more, but I don't know that they would be qualifying. (I know, I'm falling apart.)

The main problem I'm having is no one will talk to me unless the MEB process has startred. My RILOS for asthma come back with an ok to continue service. Physically I've been on a profile and haven't had more than a waist measurement done in years. I've tried all the VA help people, asked some official AF people, etc. They all say the same thing... talk to us when the process has started.

How do I get a read on where I'm at to make an informed decision? I've done the VA calculator and it looks like with those diagnoses alone, not including my others (Spinal stenosis, shoulder/rotator cuff issues, herniated discs, knees, etc.) I'm probably at 100%

I'm worried about how well I'll do over the next couple years. it seems my health and well-being, along with my ability to care for others gets worse and worse. At the same time if I don't stick it out over the next couple years that could mean about $30k per year for the next 30 years or so? That's a huge chunk to visit grand-kids, quality of life, etc.

It looks like CRSC could fill in the gap and give me some peace of mind, but I've also heard the Air Force doesn't like to award CRSC? I kept a journal while in Iraq so I have the exact dates of every direct and indirect fire, EMEDS all, alarm red, etc.

Thanks in advance for helping me figure this out.
I can tell you upfront that GERD should be approved. It is on the VA presumptive list. Most of the other issues would involve making a specific nexus to a qualifying event. Being service connected is insufficient to make a case for CRSC. Cumulative stress will not move the needle toward qualifying for PTSD.... There must be a nexus to a specific combat event. The respiratory conditions we likely not be approved without a specific nexus. If you have a nexus, get a coworker who was present to write a letter. On x date Amn Calans was standing outside the DFAC when a 107 MM rocket exploded 30 meters away. The concussion of the explosion causes him to be unable to hear me for X hours..... Again service connection alone will not get you approved, except for GERD which is on the VA's presumptive list. CRSC is very misunderstood. Many members think they got messed over when they get denied, but the standards are higher for CRSC that service connection.
 

RonG

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I can tell you upfront that GERD should be approved. It is on the VA presumptive list. Most of the other issues would involve making a specific nexus to a qualifying event. Being service connected is insufficient to make a case for CRSC. Cumulative stress will not move the needle toward qualifying for PTSD.... There must be a nexus to a specific combat event. The respiratory conditions we likely not be approved without a specific nexus. If you have a nexus, get a coworker who was present to write a letter. On x date Amn Calans was standing outside the DFAC when a 107 MM rocket exploded 30 meters away. The concussion of the explosion causes him to be unable to hear me for X hours..... Again service connection alone will not get you approved, except for GERD which is on the VA's presumptive list. CRSC is very misunderstood. Many members think they got messed over when they get denied, but the standards are higher for CRSC that service connection.
Outstanding explanation.

Ron
 

chaplaincharlie

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The reason why the AF dosent grant CRSC claims is because most of them are meritless. Some of the denied claims posted on this board alone included "I saw pictures of dead people" "I was stationed in Kuwait and heard bombs and knew people were dying" and they appealed appealed and appealed always denied I only actually see AF CRSC claims from their special forces unit, EOD, and security forces divisions. As a Chaplain I believe you did not carry a weapon in theater and had an escort correct? That means no engaging in direct enemy combat. When the VA grants your PTSD claim they are allowed to do it under the DSM IV criteria of "fear of military and hostile activity" the CRSC boards for PTSD claims follow DSM V and that requires what we call a "stressor event." When you mention direct and indirect fire scenarios you have to very specific about what your role was during the event not after. So going out and getting an injured soldier while still under fire is something they would be looking for.
Your unit of attachment or AFSC is irrelevant. It is more about what you specifically did in armed conflict, hazardous duty, an instrument of war, or simulated war. Secondary trauma is tricky. But doing triage of mass casualties, real world, is no easy task. One could easily argue it is not secondary, but primary. I am aware of chaplains and RSTs putting themselves in harms way to help team member, so without know the specifics it is hard to render an opinion about all your contentions.
 

Elementglt

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I would review your current policy regarding your CRSC acceptance within your branch. I have looked at the U.S.C code and all applicable legal documents for my branch of service. I have found that there are updates to mission standards for the Coast Guard mission type, but I have no idea about DOD. Here are the primary references I tracked down based off a message released by the DHS:

Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2015
Section 1413a of title 10, United States Code
Section 301, 301a, 304, 307, 334, or 351 of title 37, United States Code
paragraph (1) or paragraph (2) of section 888(a) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 468(a))

In a nut shell it states that USCG members performing more specific events (search and rescue, law enforcement, PWCS, defense readiness, and many more)(not under fire necessarily) can and will qualify for CRSC. However like many others have commented you need to have a direct connection with symptoms like PTSD. In my situation I have case statements from some search and rescue events that added to my PTSD (this is well documented with the MH doc) and I am hopeful this will suffice, but we will see. Good luck and let us know. Also any of you pros want to add your 2 cents please feel free (not an expert), cheers.
 

oddpedestrian

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Im just making educated guesses based on the limited information we have on how all the service components treat CRSC claims. I know they stated that PTSD make up over half of their CRSC claims and with physical probably being 30% I would wager that hazardous/simulated/instrument make up less than a quarter. Even the chaplains GERD claim is statistically likely to fail without a nexus 82% of Gulf War claims are denied.


Although this report was three years ago a report last week stated that 78% of burn pit claims are denied (After nearly two decades of war, VA still denies 78% of veterans' burn pits claims, officials say), yes all burn pit claims require a nexus and none of the most probably diagnosis are on any presumptive list, nonetheless the Team Act (Text - S.4393 - 116th Congress (2019-2020): TEAM Act of 2020) has some momentum and hopefully the Chaplains respiratory issues will be presumptive if the bill passes but I wouldnt hold my breath the VA will grant it without a nexus.
 
Last edited:

bonecrusher07

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Im just making educated guesses based on the limited information we have on how all the service components treat CRSC claims. I know they stated that PTSD make up over half of their CRSC claims and with physical probably being 30% I would wager that hazardous/simulated/instrument make up less than a quarter. Even the chaplains GERD claim is statistically likely to fail without a nexus 82% of Gulf War claims are denied.


Although this report was three years ago a report last week stated that 78% of burn pit claims are denied (After nearly two decades of war, VA still denies 78% of veterans' burn pits claims, officials say), yes all burn pit claims require a nexus and none of the most probably diagnosis are on any presumptive list, nonetheless the Team Act (Text - S.4393 - 116th Congress (2019-2020): TEAM Act of 2020) has some momentum and hopefully the Chaplains respiratory issues will be presumptive if the bill passes but I wouldnt hold my breath the VA will grant it without a nexus.
Hey oddpedestrian, I am currently preparing a CRSC Claim (Army) and do have a respiratory rating for Asthma / Constrictive Bronchiolitus. I have strong Nexus letters linking it to burn pits in Iraq from a Pulmonologist. Did you ever see those get granted for CRSC? I'm still gathering the info and can't get past which box to check. It was in a combat zone, but not due to Armed Conflict (AC) but Hazardous Service (HS) seems to not really encompass it either.
 

RonG

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Hello,

From VA:

Compensation benefits for health problems

Veterans may file a claim for disability compensation for health problems they believe are related to exposure to burn pits during military service. VA decides these claims on a case-by-case basis.

At this time, research does not show evidence of long-term health problems from exposure to burn pits. VA continues to study the health of deployed Veterans.

VA.gov | Veterans Affairs <----LINK
-----------------

Sometimes folks overlook the fact that CRSC replaces waived retired pay for combat related disabilities. The waiver is due to receipt of VA compensation (the retiree agrees to the waiver in order to receive VA comp).

One of the first considerations in a CRSC case is: "Does the retiree have VA-approved (i.e., service connected) disabilities that cause the waiver of retired pay?"
I have many disabilities that are not approved by the VA as service connected. I do not receive CRSC based on any of those non-SC disabilities.

Ron
 

bonecrusher07

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
Hello,

From VA:

Compensation benefits for health problems

Veterans may file a claim for disability compensation for health problems they believe are related to exposure to burn pits during military service. VA decides these claims on a case-by-case basis.

At this time, research does not show evidence of long-term health problems from exposure to burn pits. VA continues to study the health of deployed Veterans.

VA.gov | Veterans Affairs <----LINK
-----------------

Sometimes folks overlook the fact that CRSC replaces waived retired pay for combat related disabilities. The waiver is due to receipt of VA compensation (the retiree agrees to the waiver in order to receive VA comp).

One of the first considerations in a CRSC case is: "Does the retiree have VA-approved (i.e., service connected) disabilities that cause the waiver of retired pay?"
I have many disabilities that are not approved by the VA as service connected. I do not receive CRSC based on any of those non-SC disabilities.

Ron
It is SC, one of the few that managed to get VA connection and also acknowledged by DoD during the medboard.
 

RonG

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Sounds like you might have a good CRSC case...

Ron
 
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