script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js">

Current MEB questions / Rating question

Strangert

Well-Known Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
You should apply for SSDI immediately. In the remarks section you should note that you are a wounded warrior and requesting expedited processing. You can apply online through the SS Administration. The sooner your submit your application, the sooner the 5 month clock starts. No one can receive SSDI until 5 months has elapsed.

Given your ejection fraction, working that is sedentary might be possible. But someone who has all your health info ought to be telling you about your limfacts .
Question, not sure if you know. I’m going through a divorce. Will I receive the pay for my children? Do you know of a good calculator of how much SSDI would be? Thanks in advance!
 

RonG

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
Question, not sure if you know. I’m going through a divorce. Will I receive the pay for my children? Do you know of a good calculator of how much SSDI would be? Thanks in advance!
From the Social Security Administration:

The amount of your monthly disability benefit is based on your lifetime average earnings covered by Social Security.

If you don't already have an estimate, you can get your Social Security Statement online with your personal my Social Security account or use our Benefit Calculators to determine how much you would get if you became disabled right now.

More info at: LINK <----

Social Security Calculators: LINK <----

Full disclosure: I have never computed social security disability benefits.

Ron
 

CaliCapt

Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
My VA reports finally made it back. Was seen Nov 23rd by QTC. I have a couple of questions. I want the process to go as quick as possible from here on out.

1. Does the NARSUM really even matter at this point? I’m active duty with over 20 years.

2. I have cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 39% and the evaluator marked the report as 1-3 METs. So from my understanding that should be 100% by itself. So I don’t have to worry about the VA math to get to 100% right? I have 26 other claims on top of just this one.

3. I heard somebody mention there’s extra pay if you have any ratings that are 100%, is that true?

Thank you for all the great advice and knowledge from this board!
I am
I would fight it but only if I thought I could win or if I was okay staying in longer if I had little chance to win. Do you have a specialist that would be willing to write a letter stating that your condition is stable and unlikely to change? If yes then you may be able to challenge it with FPEB. If not, your chances aren't great but you do get the benefit of more time in the military with benefits like housing stipend etc.
I am curious as well if I have over 20 years not my DOD rating matter? My initial IRILO was sent up to AFPC 15 business days ago, the wait is killing me.
 

Provis

Moderator
I am

I am curious as well if I have over 20 years not my DOD rating matter? My initial IRILO was sent up to AFPC 15 business days ago, the wait is killing me.
Yes it still matters. You get the higher of the 2 options. So if DOD% is higher than retirement % you end up with more than if you had a regular retirement. Also, you would still qualify for CRPD/ So getting that PDRL locks you in and it won't change. TDRL basically means the condition isn't stable enough to rate so that rating can change.
 

RonG

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
Yes it still matters. You get the higher of the 2 options. So if DOD% is higher than retirement % you end up with more than if you had a regular retirement. Also, you would still qualify for CRPD/ So getting that PDRL locks you in and it won't change. TDRL basically means the condition isn't stable enough to rate so that rating can change.
The computation of retired pay for those who also qualify for a regular retirement (i.e., 20 yrs AD) is as stated above.

However, you will not receive any payment that is in excess of the longevity portion of retired pay;

The retiree in the scenario above whose pay is computed using the DoD disability percentage will experience the following:
--Retired pay will be reduced by amount of VA compensation received. There could be residual retired pay (retired pay left over).
--CRDP will restore the longevity portion of retired pay.
However,
--The combination of residual/left over retired pay and CRDP cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

I do not see a monetary benefit if the retiree is eligible for CRDP.

If the retiree is not eligible for CRDP, then there could be a benefit from the DoD percentage since the retiree keeps the residual retired pay.

Ron
 

CaliCapt

Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
The computation of retired pay for those who also qualify for a regular retirement (i.e., 20 yrs AD) is as stated above.

However, you will not receive any payment that is in excess of the longevity portion of retired pay;

The retiree in the scenario above whose pay is computed using the DoD disability percentage will experience the following:
--Retired pay will be reduced by amount of VA compensation received. There could be residual retired pay (retired pay left over).
--CRDP will restore the longevity portion of retired pay.
However,
--The combination of residual/left over retired pay and CRDP cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

I do not see a monetary benefit if the retiree is eligible for CRDP.

If the retiree is not eligible for CRDP, then there could be a benefit from the DoD percentage since the retiree keeps the residual retired pay.

Ron
Thank you very much! I really do appreciate your response as well as this awesome forum!
 

Strangert

Well-Known Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
The computation of retired pay for those who also qualify for a regular retirement (i.e., 20 yrs AD) is as stated above.

However, you will not receive any payment that is in excess of the longevity portion of retired pay;

The retiree in the scenario above whose pay is computed using the DoD disability percentage will experience the following:
--Retired pay will be reduced by amount of VA compensation received. There could be residual retired pay (retired pay left over).
--CRDP will restore the longevity portion of retired pay.
However,
--The combination of residual/left over retired pay and CRDP cannot exceed the dollar amount of the longevity portion of retired pay.

I do not see a monetary benefit if the retiree is eligible for CRDP.

If the retiree is not eligible for CRDP, then there could be a benefit from the DoD percentage since the retiree keeps the residual retired pay.

Ron
Sir, maybe you can help with this. I retired and my state of residence since I joined was Illinois. I’m now staying in South Carolina. How do I change my state of residence? No taxes are being taken out of my retirement, not a horrible thing but I know it will catch up to me eventually. Thank you!

heff
 

chaplaincharlie

Super Moderator
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
What is the downside to fighting a TDRL rating? A little more time in the service is all it takes.
 

RonG

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
Sir, maybe you can help with this. I retired and my state of residence since I joined was Illinois. I’m now staying in South Carolina. How do I change my state of residence? No taxes are being taken out of my retirement, not a horrible thing but I know it will catch up to me eventually. Thank you!

heff
You can do that thru DFAS MyPay. I have changed my legal state residence at least three times since I retired.


Ron
 

sandsailor

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
Just to clarify, are you suggesting to file for SSDI as soon as starting the MEB process?

The reason I ask is I'm just beginning the MEB process and have been unable to work in rate for nearly two years now. I've heard that the SSDI process can be started early, but unsure of when it is legal to start? For reference, I have a previous VA rating of 80% which I received during a service gap and am going to MEB for PTSD, which will be a new claim along with, unfortunately, a few new conditions.
 

RonG

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
Just to clarify, are you suggesting to file for SSDI as soon as starting the MEB process?

The reason I ask is I'm just beginning the MEB process and have been unable to work in rate for nearly two years now. I've heard that the SSDI process can be started early, but unsure of when it is legal to start? For reference, I have a previous VA rating of 80% which I received during a service gap and am going to MEB for PTSD, which will be a new claim along with, unfortunately, a few new conditions.
Hello @sandsailor ,

To whom is your question directed? There are 5-6 other people commenting in this thread.

Ron
 

sandsailor

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
@RonG my mistake, I thought I had quoted @chaplaincharlie regarding applying for SSDI immediately.

Wondering if there is a particular point in the PEB process that is best to file for SSDI? As soon as the MEB is initiated?
 

chaplaincharlie

Super Moderator
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Lifetime Supporter
Registered Member
If you can not work in your rate, apply for SSDI. The criteria for SSDI is different than VA or DoD, so approval is not automatic.
 

Strangert

Well-Known Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
You can do that thru DFAS MyPay. I have changed my legal state residence at least three times since I retired.


Ron
Where at? I’ve looked several times and can’t figure out where to do it. I’m sure it’s staring at me. Thank I’m adavance!
 
Top