Reservist with 17 years and 100% VA rating Med Retirement

Hello all,

I am an Army Reservist with 17 years of service. I recently received a VA rating of 100% for multiple issues, one being 70% for residuals of TBI with PTSD. I am looking for any advice on how I should start the process to be Med Boarded. It is my current understanding that I have to have a permanent 3 on file, but are there conditions that don't require you to have several temporary profiles before submitting for a permanent i.e. PTSD or Sleep Apnea? Thanks in advance!
 
Hello all,

I am an Army Reservist with 17 years of service. I recently received a VA rating of 100% for multiple issues, one being 70% for residuals of TBI with PTSD. I am looking for any advice on how I should start the process to be Med Boarded. It is my current understanding that I have to have a permanent 3 on file, but are there conditions that don't require you to have several temporary profiles before submitting for a permanent i.e. PTSD or Sleep Apnea? Thanks in advance!
Any chance you can stick it out until 20 good years? If so you will be able to get CRDP at age 60 or slightly less if reduced by qualified deployments. If you are medically retired any money received would be offset by VA compensation leaving you only with your VA compensation and tricare. There may not be much to gain compensation wise except being able to apply for CRSC earlier if retired by Chapter 61 medical retirement instead of later on for a non regular Reserve Retirement. I would do some research to figure out what you think you would get approved for CRSC and then also calculate your longevity portion of your current retirement earned. Those are some hard caps for CRSC. So for example if your CRSC rating that you expect is high then the cap for additional compensation is your longevity. if you have lets say 2000 points that would only be 5.5 years equivalent meaning the most you could get is 13.75% of your high 3 or if blended retirement 11% of your high 3. High 3 is calculated by taking your active duty base pay equivalent for the last 36 months and adding it together and then dividing it by 36. A less accurate way it to take your base monthly pay now if you were active duty and use that figure but the estimate will be a bit higher than reality.

Now on to answering your question. You need a profile. If you can drill and do everything then you aren't going to get a profile and you can't get sent to a fit for duty exam. Also, even if they do find you unfit many times they will claim its non duty related and you will be kicked out with no pension or severance. That's why I asked about sticking it out to hit your 20 good years. Then be put in the gray area retirement waiting to apply for your non regular retirement when you reach eligible age to retire.
 
So I figure there's not much in a reserve retirement, I have about 3200 (if I wait 20 years I'll have around 3400) points and about 8 1/2 years of active time. All of my disabilities are combat related and annotated so with the VA, but I wouldn't put it past the Army to say they are not. Either way I think if I can get a medical retirement, the benifits outweigh the negative. I would be able to collect CRSC and any portion of my retirement right away and, not that I need it, Tricare. At this point in my career I am already on to my second shoulder surgery and broke from the floor up. Could I slide the last 3 years probably, but the ACFT and any major operations are probably off the table.
 
Any chance you can stick it out until 20 good years? If so you will be able to get CRDP at age 60 or slightly less if reduced by qualified deployments. If you are medically retired any money received would be offset by VA compensation leaving you only with your VA compensation and tricare. There may not be much to gain compensation wise except being able to apply for CRSC earlier if retired by Chapter 61 medical retirement instead of later on for a non regular Reserve Retirement. I would do some research to figure out what you think you would get approved for CRSC and then also calculate your longevity portion of your current retirement earned. Those are some hard caps for CRSC. So for example if your CRSC rating that you expect is high then the cap for additional compensation is your longevity. if you have lets say 2000 points that would only be 5.5 years equivalent meaning the most you could get is 13.75% of your high 3 or if blended retirement 11% of your high 3. High 3 is calculated by taking your active duty base pay equivalent for the last 36 months and adding it together and then dividing it by 36. A less accurate way it to take your base monthly pay now if you were active duty and use that figure but the estimate will be a bit higher than reality.

Now on to answering your question. You need a profile. If you can drill and do everything then you aren't going to get a profile and you can't get sent to a fit for duty exam. Also, even if they do find you unfit many times they will claim its non duty related and you will be kicked out with no pension or severance. That's why I asked about sticking it out to hit your 20 good years. Then be put in the gray area retirement waiting to apply for your non regular retirement when you reach eligible age to retire.
So I figure there's not much in a reserve retirement, I have about 3200 (if I wait 20 years I'll have around 3400) points and about 8 1/2 years of active time. All of my disabilities are combat related and annotated so with the VA, but I wouldn't put it past the Army to say they are not. Either way I think if I can get a medical retirement, the benifits outweigh the negative. I would be able to collect CRSC and any portion of my retirement right away and, not that I need it, Tricare. At this point in my career I am already on to my second shoulder surgery and broke from the floor up. Could I slide the last 3 years probably, but the ACFT and any major operations are probably off the table.
 
I am still a drilling reservist with 21 years in service but only 17 good years and a combined 100% VA rating. I took the profile request packet for behavioral health and physical abilities for ACFT to my VA primary care provider to have it completed. Then I submitted it to the Army medical management United States Army Reserve Medical Management Center .. That triggered an MEB. that process I started 12 months ago and got my DOD rating this week. just accept the IDES and elect to NOT file a VA claim.

Good Luck.
 
I am still a drilling reservist with 21 years in service but only 17 good years and a combined 100% VA rating. I took the profile request packet for behavioral health and physical abilities for ACFT to my VA primary care provider to have it completed. Then I submitted it to the Army medical management United States Army Reserve Medical Management Center .. That triggered an MEB. that process I started 12 months ago and got my DOD rating this week. just accept the IDES and elect to NOT file a VA claim.

Good Luck.
When you submitted your profile packet, was it just once and it triggered the MEB or did you have to submit a temporary 3 times?
 
When you submitted your profile packet, was it just once and it triggered the MEB or did you have to submit a temporary 3 times?
I submitted everything one time for a profile. They issued a temporary initially then it turned P3.
 
I am still a drilling reservist with 21 years in service but only 17 good years and a combined 100% VA rating. I took the profile request packet for behavioral health and physical abilities for ACFT to my VA primary care provider to have it completed. Then I submitted it to the Army medical management United States Army Reserve Medical Management Center .. That triggered an MEB. that process I started 12 months ago and got my DOD rating this week. just accept the IDES and elect to NOT file a VA claim.

Good Luck.
I am a reservist with a VA rating of 100% P&T. Is there a way I can still go through the MEB process, and get medically retired, vs just quietly transferring to the Army Retired Reserve, and wait until I am 60 to collect my regular pension? It would be much more preferable to me to collect the medical retirement pension now + VA disability compensation (I am 38 for context).
 
I am a reservist with a VA rating of 100% P&T. Is there a way I can still go through the MEB process, and get medically retired, vs just quietly transferring to the Army Retired Reserve, and wait until I am 60 to collect my regular pension? It would be much more preferable to me to collect the medical retirement pension now + VA disability compensation (I am 38 for context).
If you have 20 good years and can be moved into the Army Retired Reserves I would go that route. The REAL QUESTION is if you should be put in IDES. If you are able to do your job then no. If you have medical limitations that prevent you from doing your job and you have a LOD for them then yes.

I strive for every Soldier to get the compensation they deserve but to me this comes across as a ploy to get a medical retirement without much basis. If you have 20 good years and haven't been referred to IDES for a LOD related medical condition the correct move is to either stay in or be placed in Army Retired Reserve until you are eligible to apply for your earned non regular retirement.
 
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