Rhabdomyolysis

tryingtolive

Member
Registered Member
I ended up in the hospital with a CK level of 34000 after doing over 300 push ups for PT. We received a new plt sgt and all we did was run everyday 3-5 miles (no stretching) to include thursdays and also our post had change PT to the afternoon. We did nothing but run for about two weeks and out of no where he wanted to do something call 7Heaven. This happen on a tuesday so throughout the week I was thinking I just had soreness on my triceps. That Friday my wife force me to go to the hospital because i could not feed myself or hold my newborn and had a pulsating pain. I was hospitalize for about two days and five days of convalescent leave. I was diagnosed with Rhabdomyolisis and later when I had another episode be call by doctors as chronic rhabdomyolisis. Since than when any time I even do 20 push ups or anything physical that requires me to lift things or be on my feet for majority of the day... my legs begin to hurt (my second episode was because my legs we hurting my ck levels went high.)

Well the problem I am facing is that the rheumatologist is saying that I could not have gotten rhabdo (that high of a level or chronic) just from exercising that there must be something else. He I am currently pending approval to go to the University Center in Scottsdale, AZ to see a muscle specialist and testing. Because that is what the second neurologist that I've seen recommends. He (rheumatologist) also mention that I might now be able to stay in because of the rhabdo and that he had already discharge three other soldier for high ck levels even with undiagnose reason. I cannot find any information if I will recieve medical benefits and/or compensation or if I can be medically retired because of this. I asked the doctor if I would receive benefits after if I get discharge he said yes but I well know that he is not the approving authority.

By the way I have always been able to do physically demanding activities such as 6.2miles ruck/run......always passed my APFT....I've always been strong....I am currently in the 25 series but I use to be 88M and had no problem being part of a HET platoon for two deployments.

I don't have any family history of muscle problems. Everyone that hears about this always mentions that it's something related to individuals just joining. I have seven years active duty. DOES ANYONE KNOW ANYTHING RELATED TO MY SITUATION?
 

carnelli53

Moderator
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
tryingtolive,

Welcome to the PEBForum. Sorry to hear about your situation.

Sounds like they haven't identified the implications of Rhabdomyolisis. In any case, Rhabdomyolysis is grounds for referral to a Medical Evaluation Board (MEB), from AR 40-501 Chapter 3-40:

u. Exertional rhabdomyolysis. The diagnosis of exertional rhabdomyolysis, defined as severe exercise-induced
muscle pain resulting from repetitive exercise with an elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK) generally at least 5
times the upper limit of the lab normal range or urine myoglobin, will be referred to a MEB if the Soldier has—
(1) Recurrent episodes of exertional rhabdomyolysis; or
(2) A single episode with severe systemic complications (for example, compartment syndrome); or
(3) A single episode results in physical complications that interfere with successful performance of duty.
(4) Soldiers with any of the following symptoms 2 weeks after experiencing an episode of exertional rhabdomyolyis
should be referred to the appropriate specialist for consideration of referral to an MEB:
(a) Persistent residual kidney injury; or
(b) Persistent elevation of serum CK 5 times the upper limit of the lab normal range or delayed clinical recovery; or
(c) A history of sickle cell trait.
(5) The Uniformed Services University Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP) (http://champ.
usuhs.mil) is available electronically to assist in clinical consultation at [email protected]. In addition, a Clinical
Practice Guideline in the Management of Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in Soldiers is available at: USU Consortium for Health and Military Performance
chclinicaltools.html.
Essentially, the Army cannot just kick you to the curb due to this condition. If you were to be discharged due to Rhabdomyolysis or a medical issue secondary to the Rhabdomyolysis, it would be after going through the MEB/PEB process. The only three possible results are:

(1) Fit for Duty (you return to duty),
(2) Unfit for Duty - separation with severance pay (20% or less rating, base pay x years of service x 2 = severance pay), or
(3) Unfit for Duty - medical retirement (30% or greater rating, can be placed either on the TDRL or PDRL). Also with medical retirement, you receive entitlement to a monthly pension and Tricare Prime benefits (among other things). Pay is computed by taking your 3 highest years of active duty pay (known as the HIGH-3 or HI-3 formula), averaging them, and then deduct according to your disability percentage (capped at 75%). Thus, if you have a 50% rating and your HI-3 is $5000, you receive $2500 monthly.

Hope this helps, there will likely be other questions/issues to address as you move along. Don't hesitate to ask more questions if you have them and good luck with your upcoming appointments.

As a side bar, just my opinion, your platoon sergeant was beyond wrong for (1) not stretching before runs and (2) running everyday. Such a regimen will only lead to injury and is not at all conducive to muscle growth or increasing endurance.
 

PreventingUnfairness

Member
Registered Member
carnelli53,

I am in a similar situation as tryingtolive. This is my second bout with Rhabdo, both of them happened while serving in the Army Reserves due to physical exertion (I do pass my APFTs). The first time on AT orders, and the second time now while I am deployed. Both required 4-5 days hospitalization since my CK levels went as high as 54000!.
But now they are telling me that because it happened twice (2010 and 2012) the hospital will be requesting that I get a Med Board, and That I will most likely be sent back to the states to go through the process.

I have been in the USAR for 3 years now. And since the Army is in "cutback mode" I am concerned that they are probably going to kick me out. I always wanted to be a soldier since I was a kid (I'm 38 now) But if it is not meant to be for me to be in the military that's fine, I can accept that. I am a single dad with two kids and my health is more important. But what bothers me is that what the outcome of this action can be. Specially since I was relying on the Army for income through this deployment.

I am afraid of the worst case scenario and that the Army may try to separate me without benefits or financial assistance to help me. I honestly don't know what to do, or what I will be facing, and judging by the limited internet research I am doing right now, it seems like the help, resources and assistance for Soldiers in my situation/condition is almost non-existent. I also have other injuries that are service related; a plantaar faccitis bilateral surgery, a broken finger, etc. But I don't know how that comes into play in my claim.

I really need some guidance on what could happen to me in this process. What should I do? How do I get the VA involved? I am so lost. Am I going to loose everything I worked so hard for? I feel that whatever happens its going to be unfair to me and my family.

What should I do?














tryingtolive,

Welcome to the PEBForum. Sorry to hear about your situation.

Sounds like they haven't identified the implications of Rhabdomyolisis. In any case, Rhabdomyolysis is grounds for referral to a Medical Evaluation Board (MEB), from AR 40-501 Chapter 3-40:



Essentially, the Army cannot just kick you to the curb due to this condition. If you were to be discharged due to Rhabdomyolysis or a medical issue secondary to the Rhabdomyolysis, it would be after going through the MEB/PEB process. The only three possible results are:

(1) Fit for Duty (you return to duty),
(2) Unfit for Duty - separation with severance pay (20% or less rating, base pay x years of service x 2 = severance pay), or
(3) Unfit for Duty - medical retirement (30% or greater rating, can be placed either on the TDRL or PDRL). Also with medical retirement, you receive entitlement to a monthly pension and Tricare Prime benefits (among other things). Pay is computed by taking your 3 highest years of active duty pay (known as the HIGH-3 or HI-3 formula), averaging them, and then deduct according to your disability percentage (capped at 75%). Thus, if you have a 50% rating and your HI-3 is $5000, you receive $2500 monthly.

Hope this helps, there will likely be other questions/issues to address as you move along. Don't hesitate to ask more questions if you have them and good luck with your upcoming appointments.

As a side bar, just my opinion, your platoon sergeant was beyond wrong for (1) not stretching before runs and (2) running everyday. Such a regimen will only lead to injury and is not at all conducive to muscle growth or increasing endurance.
 

carnelli53

Moderator
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
PreventingUnfairness,

Let me first state that, save for your condition being the result of your own misconduct or some other grave injustice occurring, you will not be simply shoved out of the Army in the way you described. But at the same time, your approach and expectations of the process are probably the best ones a person can have - remaining vigilant and scrutinizing every part of the process is an important task for all servicemembers to execute as they travel through the MEB/PEB system.

First and foremost, assuming you have been referred to a MEB, you will likely be redeployed to CONUS. Whenever the MEB begins, which could be some time from now, you must reveal all medical conditions that you have - this assures that the MEB will properly evaluate all your conditions and pass a complete record on to the PEB; this way, all of your conditions will be evaluated in determining your "fitness for duty" and, in the end, your disability rating. I do not say this here to protect the service's interest, but rather to try and illustrate that you are protecting your own interests by full disclosure of all medical conditions.

Second, and as you probably guess, the process takes some time. Assuming you are USAR, some issues specific to reserve service may arise. This forum probably has hundreds of threads dealing with the various issues faced by reservists in the MEB/PEB process. It is a great database of information. You should use what you find here to the fullest extent possible. This, of course, has the implied task of doing the work - the research. Feel free to message myself, the other moderators, and the members who posted on similar situations to get their thoughts. This is a community and everyone here is willing to help in any way they can.

Finally, to answer your concerns specifically, "I really need some guidance on what could happen to me in this process. What should I do? How do I get the VA involved? I am so lost. Am I going to loose everything I worked so hard for? I feel that whatever happens its going to be unfair to me and my family. What should I do"

You will not lose everything. But this process is not a simple one. It will press the patience and good will you have towards the military establishment that, it seems from your post, has treated you fairly up to this point. This is not the fault of any one person, rather, it is the system itself that needs repair. But as the old saying goes, knowledge is power. Educate yourself about the system. If you have the time, I'd suggest becoming familiar with some laws and Army Regulations so you at least have a general idea of your rights and how the process works. You can google the sources I've listed below - read them several times over at your convenience.

AR 40-501 Chapter 3 (Standards of Medical Fitness)
AR 635-40 (Read this over and over again)
Title 10, United States Code, Chapter 61 (This chapter contains the federal laws governing the MEB/PEB process)
Veterans Affairs Schedule for Rating Disabilities (This is the reference used to rate your condition(s)).

So to answer your question of "what should I do?" - I'd begin by reading these sources, liberally utilizing the "search" function of this forum, messaging forum members with questions, and preparing yourself for a time-consuming process. You will be much better off beginning this process properly trained and equipped - unlike combat deployments, the military will not properly train and equip you for the MEB/PEB process. You have to do it yourself, but just remember you are not alone when doing so.

My last opinion is to insure that you maintain your military bearing. Understand that some of your superiors are not going to "like" the fact that you are in the MEB/PEB process. Understand that they will almost definitely not comprehend how the process works. Understand that they will likely be of little to no help whatsoever - but if you maintain your bearing and keep them informed, the obstacles in the process which require their action will be much easier to negotiate.
 

NTC40

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
I'm in the Navy, w/ 8yrs of AD. I'm also in a similair situation w/ three episodes of Rhabdo. Quick question, what are my chances of going back to full duty? I'm not sure if that's even possible at this point....

I'd appreciate any insight and or information pertaining to how the Navy processes Rhabdomyolysis PEB packages!
 

dsalley16

Member
Registered Member
I'm currently awaiting results from a PEB. doing my 13 years in the Navy I have knowingly experienced 3 episodes of Rhabdo. It wasn't until my twin brother started to experience the same thing that he was sent to The Navy Medical Center, and the did a muscle biopsy on him. The results came back the he had a genetic mutation, that caused a condition called Malignant Hyperthermia (not to be confused with the cold weather condition). Basically Rhabdo is a side affect, or symptom of the disorder, and in certain conditions the disorder can be deadly.
 

NTC40

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
I'm currently awaiting results from a PEB. doing my 13 years in the Navy I have knowingly experienced 3 episodes of Rhabdo. It wasn't until my twin brother started to experience the same thing that he was sent to The Navy Medical Center, and the did a muscle biopsy on him. The results came back the he had a genetic mutation, that caused a condition called Malignant Hyperthermia (not to be confused with the cold weather condition). Basically Rhabdo is a side affect, or symptom of the disorder, and in certain conditions the disorder can be deadly.
Was he discharged from the Navy for the Malignant Hyperthermia? Can you get waived for such conditions?

Are you currently being PEB for Rhabdo too?

I'm having my biopsy done also, should get results in 1-2 wks. I've been accepted to Biomed C school and want to stay full duty or at least stay fit for duty so I can attend the school.

If my results get back, and it shows I've got a similair metabolic definciency will that result in seperation w/ any disability ratings?
 

dsalley16

Member
Registered Member
My brother is about 2 weeks ahead of me with his PEB. He is in the Army and they already told him that he was found unfit, but he is still waiting for his VA Rating. My Peblo told me that if I did not get an answer 2 weeks ago that I would most likely be unfit. Which was what the person who submitted me for consideration to the MEB told me. Basically the test to find out if you have MH is a scientific study, and there is only 4 places in the US that do it. Because it's a scientific study they can only release the results to you and it's up to you rather you release the information to the Navy. If you choose to tell them then they will submit you to PEB. If you don't and something happens to you and it's due to or related to MH then they can say that they can't be held liable because you with held a life threatening condition from them. Where are you getting your biopsy at?
 

NTC40

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
My brother is about 2 weeks ahead of me with his PEB. He is in the Army and they already told him that he was found unfit, but he is still waiting for his VA Rating. My Peblo told me that if I did not get an answer 2 weeks ago that I would most likely be unfit. Which was what the person who submitted me for consideration to the MEB told me. Basically the test to find out if you have MH is a scientific study, and there is only 4 places in the US that do it. Because it's a scientific study they can only release the results to you and it's up to you rather you release the information to the Navy. If you choose to tell them then they will submit you to PEB. If you don't and something happens to you and it's due to or related to MH then they can say that they can't be held liable because you with held a life threatening condition from them. Where are you getting your biopsy at?
I see. Thanks for the heads up on that! Interesting, I'll have to keep in mind the two weeks rule if I proceed w/ the PEB pkg.

The Neuro doc tells me he's pretty confident a metabolic myopathy exists provided my three cases w/ in one year and my current myoglobin serum results are high. He also mentioned still a chance my biopsy could come back w/ no real findings. I'm in San Diego, this will all be done through The Naval hospital here.

If found unfit can you request to get a waiver to stay full duty/fit for duty? From what I gather my superiors (a lot of experience w PEB packages)tell me if I function fine everyday at work and can still meet/exceed the standards then I should have a great chance of staying in. Though they don't exactly know the full extent of every detail of my lab findings/muscle biopsy prognosis, they do know I've had a couple Rhabdo cases.

Roughly what's the disability rating for genetic metabolic disorders like this or just Rhabdo alone if any? What if results come back normal from the biopsy and your left w just the history of three Rhabdo episodes, will DOD still find this unfit and provide disability ?
 

adonis06

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
I ended up in the hospital with a CK level of 34000 after doing over 300 push ups for PT. We received a new plt sgt and all we did was run everyday 3-5 miles (no stretching) to include thursdays and also our post had change PT to the afternoon. We did nothing but run for about two weeks and out of no where he wanted to do something call 7Heaven. This happen on a tuesday so throughout the week I was thinking I just had soreness on my triceps. That Friday my wife force me to go to the hospital because i could not feed myself or hold my newborn and had a pulsating pain. I was hospitalize for about two days and five days of convalescent leave. I was diagnosed with Rhabdomyolisis and later when I had another episode be call by doctors as chronic rhabdomyolisis. Since than when any time I even do 20 push ups or anything physical that requires me to lift things or be on my feet for majority of the day... my legs begin to hurt (my second episode was because my legs we hurting my ck levels went high.)

Well the problem I am facing is that the rheumatologist is saying that I could not have gotten rhabdo (that high of a level or chronic) just from exercising that there must be something else. He I am currently pending approval to go to the University Center in Scottsdale, AZ to see a muscle specialist and testing. Because that is what the second neurologist that I've seen recommends. He (rheumatologist) also mention that I might now be able to stay in because of the rhabdo and that he had already discharge three other soldier for high ck levels even with undiagnose reason. I cannot find any information if I will recieve medical benefits and/or compensation or if I can be medically retired because of this. I asked the doctor if I would receive benefits after if I get discharge he said yes but I well know that he is not the approving authority.

By the way I have always been able to do physically demanding activities such as 6.2miles ruck/run......always passed my APFT....I've always been strong....I am currently in the 25 series but I use to be 88M and had no problem being part of a HET platoon for two deployments.

I don't have any family history of muscle problems. Everyone that hears about this always mentions that it's something related to individuals just joining. I have seven years active duty. DOES ANYONE KNOW ANYTHING RELATED TO MY SITUATION?
I see. Thanks for the heads up on that! Interesting, I'll have to keep in mind the two weeks rule if I proceed w/ the PEB pkg.

The Neuro doc tells me he's pretty confident a metabolic myopathy exists provided my three cases w/ in one year and my current myoglobin serum results are high. He also mentioned still a chance my biopsy could come back w/ no real findings. I'm in San Diego, this will all be done through The Naval hospital here.

If found unfit can you request to get a waiver to stay full duty/fit for duty? From what I gather my superiors (a lot of experience w PEB packages)tell me if I function fine everyday at work and can still meet/exceed the standards then I should have a great chance of staying in. Though they don't exactly know the full extent of every detail of my lab findings/muscle biopsy prognosis, they do know I've had a couple Rhabdo cases.

Roughly what's the disability rating for genetic metabolic disorders like this or just Rhabdo alone if any? What if results come back normal from the biopsy and your left w just the history of three Rhabdo episodes, will DOD still find this unfit and provide disability ?
I ended up in the hospital with a CK level of 34000 after doing over 300 push ups for PT. We received a new plt sgt and all we did was run everyday 3-5 miles (no stretching) to include thursdays and also our post had change PT to the afternoon. We did nothing but run for about two weeks and out of no where he wanted to do something call 7Heaven. This happen on a tuesday so throughout the week I was thinking I just had soreness on my triceps. That Friday my wife force me to go to the hospital because i could not feed myself or hold my newborn and had a pulsating pain. I was hospitalize for about two days and five days of convalescent leave. I was diagnosed with Rhabdomyolisis and later when I had another episode be call by doctors as chronic rhabdomyolisis. Since than when any time I even do 20 push ups or anything physical that requires me to lift things or be on my feet for majority of the day... my legs begin to hurt (my second episode was because my legs we hurting my ck levels went high.)

Well the problem I am facing is that the rheumatologist is saying that I could not have gotten rhabdo (that high of a level or chronic) just from exercising that there must be something else. He I am currently pending approval to go to the University Center in Scottsdale, AZ to see a muscle specialist and testing. Because that is what the second neurologist that I've seen recommends. He (rheumatologist) also mention that I might now be able to stay in because of the rhabdo and that he had already discharge three other soldier for high ck levels even with undiagnose reason. I cannot find any information if I will recieve medical benefits and/or compensation or if I can be medically retired because of this. I asked the doctor if I would receive benefits after if I get discharge he said yes but I well know that he is not the approving authority.

By the way I have always been able to do physically demanding activities such as 6.2miles ruck/run......always passed my APFT....I've always been strong....I am currently in the 25 series but I use to be 88M and had no problem being part of a HET platoon for two deployments.

I don't have any family history of muscle problems. Everyone that hears about this always mentions that it's something related to individuals just joining. I have seven years active duty. DOES ANYONE KNOW ANYTHING RELATED TO MY SITUATION?
What was the final outcome for your situation? I would like talk with you because your situation is identical to my situation except I have 23 years of active federal service. Any advice or recommendation you can provide me with will be greatly appreciated.
 

PreventingUnfairness

Member
Registered Member
Update to my situation:
(It may be a bit long, but I want to share with you guys as much info as I have gathered on how the Army currently deals with this condition)

Well, it turns out that the Army Reg automatically kicks in an MEB if you have a 2nd episode of Rhabdo (regardless). I have been here at the Madigan Army Medical Center since I got Medvac from down range in April this year. After going through all the extensive invasive testing from all the separate specialists, they found out that I am fully clinically recovered. But they are divided among themselves whether to proceed with the muscle biopsy or not. Neurology wants it, but General Surgery is fighting it because they do not see "any benefit" to me "the patient" to get that done. The surgeon says that rarely a muscle biopsy helps them find the "smoking gun" that will make a difference in treatment or origin of the condition. They sent extensive blood work outside to a university that does the studies (mentioned in one of the posts below), but they did not find anything. And the surgeon argues that it will be the same result with the muscle biopsy.

But nonetheless, I still have to go through the MEB process, and I can still be found "unfit for duty" or "return to duty" (re-classified with a new MOS and perhaps on a "non-deployable" status) per the MEB doctor and Army Regs. Now it is going to be up to my MEB doctor to decide whether I need the muscle biopsy or not, and it will be his consideration if I am going to be "retained" or not. Based on liability, Rhabdo re-occurance possibilities, your new level of activity limitations, and if you can continue to do your job (MOS). All of our cases are going to be different, but this is what you can expect (my experiences so far) with the system.
Here are some things you need to know:

- There are 4 key players in this process: Big Army Medical, MEB/PEB Doctors, the VA, and you.

1. Big Army Medical System: They will try to give you the lowest disability rating possible, and you will find yourself fighting for the medical care you deserve sometimes. They will only treat you for the condition that got you MED boarded for. Meaning that if you got the MEB because of Rhabdo, but you also have PTSD, they will treat you for both, but only rate you on the Rhabdo. If you wan to get your disability rating on your PTSD, it will be another fight, another day. But do make sure they fix whatever is wrong with you when you go. This is your chance to get all your old injuries looked at. Specially if it is something you think you may need care for later in life.

2. MEB Doctors: A little bit better. These guys at least will hear you out and you can "let it all out" as far as your medical condition and history. Your MEB Doctor will ultimately write your "NARSUM" which is your medical "narrative summary" which in turn is used in tandem with your VA claim. They mostly tend to lean towards discharging you and trying to help you as much as possible with your rating (Which really helps most guys that have suffered severe injuries and need to get out and need care immediately). So if you are trying to stay in, you need to tell them emphatically. If there is a waiver that they can use to help you, they will try. Not a guarantee it will work though. Since their recommendation weights heavily on the ultimate decision, they may just go for your best interest and push you out (with everything you deserve though).

3. Veteran Affairs (VA): These are the guys on your side. They may not be able to help you with retention in the military, but these guys are there to help you get what you need for your care for the rest of your life. Once you start your MEB process, you are also going to have a VA claim started at the same time. So will will also have a few appointments with the VA. The VA will give you their own disability rating based on your conditions (which is usually higher than the Army's), so make sure you tell them EVERYTHING that is wrong with you since you joined the service (injuries, illnesses, etc) You will not have a second chance! Be prepared as much as you can when you go see them. Get all the old medical records you can find on yourself whether is military or civilian care (that is military related of course). The more documentation you have, the better (Old LOD's, sick call slips, copy of your medical file from your unit, etc). DO NOT miss or be late to any of their appointments! You can literally set yourself back 5 years until the next appointment available. No joke.
You will get two disability ratings at the end (I don't know what we would get for Rhabdo), the Army's and the VA's rating. And you will get the highest of the two. Which is; you guessed it, the VA's. Note: You can always appeal the ratings if something goes wrong and you don't get what you think its fair. But keep in mind that appeals can last up to a decade at worst. So just try to do things right in the first place.

You: The only thing you can really do is "be your strongest advocate" (you are going to hear that a lot, but it's true) If you have a question, ask! If you have a doubt, ask! The system is not perfect by any means, and your case can be mismanaged or even fall through the cracks if you are not attentive. Manage your administrative side like your life depends on it! Save everything, save as much paperwork as possible, get copies of records, etc.

My two cents - so far in the process: There is nothing I would like more than to stay in circulation in the Army. I always wanted to be a soldier and I wanted to be a lifer. But when I talk to these doctors and I tell them what I want (even after all this happened), their eyes open up and they look at me like I am crazy.
Being stuck here for so long, and the likelihood of being stuck in the process for double that time is overwhelming to me. But most of all, living here in the WTB (Warrior Transition Battalion) side by side will all these other wounded warriors that have been through hell (far worst than me) gave a reality check, and thus the acceptance that I think we all need.
Rhabdo is a life-threatening condition than can severely maim us or kill us next time it happens. I could lie and minimize it all I want so I can stay in. But what if next time it happens I am deployed again at an outpost that is too far to get me help on time, or I just don't "feel it" on time and it is too late to save my kidneys or avoid compartment syndrome or something. How am I going to tell my kids about it? If I even make it next time...
The phrase "It is, what it is" has a whole new meaning to me now. I am just going to go along for the ride now and see what happens. I learned that we all have to learn how to pick n' choose our battles sooner or later.

I hope these info I got so far helps somebody, and I will post more updates as I move along further in the process.





carnelli53,

I am in a similar situation as tryingtolive. This is my second bout with Rhabdo, both of them happened while serving in the Army Reserves due to physical exertion (I do pass my APFTs). The first time on AT orders, and the second time now while I am deployed. Both required 4-5 days hospitalization since my CK levels went as high as 54000!.
But now they are telling me that because it happened twice (2010 and 2012) the hospital will be requesting that I get a Med Board, and That I will most likely be sent back to the states to go through the process.

I have been in the USAR for 3 years now. And since the Army is in "cutback mode" I am concerned that they are probably going to kick me out. I always wanted to be a soldier since I was a kid (I'm 38 now) But if it is not meant to be for me to be in the military that's fine, I can accept that. I am a single dad with two kids and my health is more important. But what bothers me is that what the outcome of this action can be. Specially since I was relying on the Army for income through this deployment.

I am afraid of the worst case scenario and that the Army may try to separate me without benefits or financial assistance to help me. I honestly don't know what to do, or what I will be facing, and judging by the limited internet research I am doing right now, it seems like the help, resources and assistance for Soldiers in my situation/condition is almost non-existent. I also have other injuries that are service related; a plantaar faccitis bilateral surgery, a broken finger, etc. But I don't know how that comes into play in my claim.

I really need some guidance on what could happen to me in this process. What should I do? How do I get the VA involved? I am so lost. Am I going to loose everything I worked so hard for? I feel that whatever happens its going to be unfair to me and my family.

What should I do?
 

Falcon A

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
Wow! I can't believe that I just found this thread. I have been severely damaged with multiple bouts of Rhabdo creating a vicious cycle with the pain in my muscle groups from feet to head, trying to recover with moderation of exercise/movement, trying to sleep at night where I wake up with cramping all over my body resulting in cruddy sleep, followed by continual dibilitating days. I first had Rhabdo when deployed (all over Afghanistan) ... first thought was dehydration (sweat, gear, movement, etc) and then diet (low Potassium?). Doc said CKs were elevated -- Rhabdo.

I am extremely interested in what you folks found out about Rhabdo to include the offsite genetic tests. Also, please let me/us know how your processes (fit/unfit, MEB, etc) have proceeded. Back stateside, ER Docs thought statins (Lipitor) were issue ... they held me off any types of these medications. At same time (interesting with statin connection) I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes and given Metformin. 1st the statins were to blame, then Metformin, then Januvia (another Diabetes med). I have been down many rabbit trails on this one (Rhabdo).

If "Dear Jason" reads this, please help to find where Chronic Rhabdo or Exertional Rhabdo mentioned above fits (degradation of skeletal muscles). It was coded by a Doc as ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 728.88 -- Rhabdomyolysis.

Thanks,

Falcon A
 

KaB

Member
Registered Member
I'd be very interested in any updates you all may have. I'm currently going through the same thing now. Came down with rhabdomyolysis back in January/February after a very heavy push-up workout and still haven't recovered from it. Started out with CK levels of 147,000 four days after having dark urine soreness and swelling. As of right now if I do any exercise my CK levels go just above normal at around 400.

I can't say for certain but I believe during the last week of boot camp was the first time I had rhabdo. I never went to medical so there is no way of telling for sure. I just remember the dark urine and swelling after the crucible. Never put two and two together until now though.

I've been put on TNPQ status for the last 2 months now. I'm concerned what will happen when I run out of time with the TNPQ status. I'm going to a university medical center next week for a EMG test. Has anyone done this before?

On another note, I had a doctors note excusing me from two hikes we were to do during our last AT. I was able to sit out the first 5 mile hike we had but when it came time for the second 8 mile hike I was asked for my note. When it was passed up all the way to our CO he said it was fake and that I would be doing the hike. I finished the hike but when we got back to our unit I went to the hospital for observation overnight. Nothing has been said about this since that day.

Now I'm having trouble getting my unit to even admit I was hurt while on duty. Hopefully this will be corrected soon.
 

adonis06

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Has anyone been found fit with rhabdomyolysis due to metabolic myopathy?
 

Falcon A

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
I am concerned that they (MEB) are categorizing my issues as "myopathy", "myalgias" and/or "myositis" ... additionally, I have been documented as having "recurring rhabdo". I feel that the MEB will group my issues under Myofacial Pain Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and/or Fibromyalgia ... exclusion diagnoses :(
 

Ultoroceanus

PEB Forum Regular Member
Registered Member
Anyone have updates to any of your cases? I know this is years old but this is very similar to my situation but with malignant hyperthermia as an underlying condition. Any help is appreciated! Thank you.
 

goose1647

New Member
Registered Member
so im going through MEB for rhabdo and im just curious as to what the average va percentage I can be looking for. my CK levels were 95000 and that was three days after being omitted into the hospital. any info would be much appreciated
 

Lalaxox32

Member
Registered Member
Hello,I'm new here.Im a female and I'm suffering from rhabdo in the army .Ive had two episodes of rhabdo with levels of 25000 and 13000 .And I'm starting the MEB process .
I wonder if the rating has anything to do with weight or gender for different body types .
What's the average va rating for this condition ?
 

ForwardObserver13Fox

New Member
Registered Member
Well, I can tell there are a lot of Brother's & Sister's from other Mother's, lol. I'm not gonna get into my military service all that much; however, (2) Tours to Baghdad, Sadr City, Iraq attached to 82nd Airborne, yes Army. Does anyone miss all the constant BS, I don't!

Anyways, we're talking about Rhabdo, right?

There's no easy way to explain this, but the experiences of feeling Rhabdo, Acute Kidney & Serotonin Syndrome all at the same time, "Is Worse then Hell!" My symptoms still to this day are extremely painful, especially after shattering my T-11 & T-12 Vertebrae 25% each. The shattering of my back is a long story, maybe for a later time.

I am actually diagnosed with almost "Twelve" (12) VA Disabilities now. It all started when I asked the VA for "Help!" Here we are 7 1/2 years later, and still waiting for a Review Officer to make a decision. Brother's & Sister's, I'm diagnosed now with, (Rhabdo, Serotonin Syndrome, Hyper-Reflexia, Acute Kidney Failure, "CKD" Chronic Kidney Disease, Myositis, TBI, PTSD, Tendonitis in both knees, Muscle Spasms, Tremors & "IBS" Irritable Bowel Syndrome).

Before my health gets the best of me, I wanted to clarify and explain a few things to all the Veteran's out there.

1) "They [VA] are now calling "PTSD"; "Other than Specified Trauma!" This is a bunch of BS! [...]so they try and rate it or call it a different name. By "Federal Law" if you have suicide ideation's, you qualify for a minimal of 70% for PTSD Alone!

2) You can have multiple symptoms rated for just "One" symptom alone! Example: Because of the multiple issues the VA has caused now (Rhabdo, CKD, Serotonin Syndrome, Acute Kidney Failure & tons more). They all have to be rated now! What this is called "Secondary Conditions."

3) The VA has a whole different rating scale called "SMC" Special Monthly Code. You can be rated higher than 100% Total & Permanent!!!

4) To look at all your VA Medical Records, VA Social Worker Reviews, and Mental Health Appointments. Go to your local VA Hospital. Find your Resource Center inside the hospital, you know where all the "Computers" are at. There should be an Employee helping Veterans with their Accounts. Ask to "Upgrade" your account to a "Premium Account." You will sign a release form, stating you understand the purpose of the release "Nonsense." Sign it and Carry On Soldier, lol.

You now can monitor the VA's every move, especially with your Benefits & Medical Records!

Brother's & Sister's, just some friendly advise. "If at any time you feel threaten by the VA or an employee of the VA. You can file an official (Office of Investigative General) complaint, which will remain private." I've attached the website below. This is how you actually get someone's attention, when "Negligence" is happening at your local VA Hospital.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

RonG

Super Moderator
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Hello Forwardobserver13Fox,

A few comments.

1. A VA account (eBenefits) has been available for 10 years. The eBenefits site was inaugurated in 2009. LINK to eBenefits Web Page
Also available is the VA's new site which offers one place to access all VA benefits and health care services. You can sign in with your My HealtheVet, DS Logon, or ID.me account to track your claims, refill your prescriptions, and more. LINK <---

2. You are correct about SMCs. They are discussed at FACT SHEET Special Monthly Compensation <---LINK
I currently receive SMC-K and SMC-S.
Law Pertaining to Special Monthly Compensation this LINK <----

3. You have offered some good remarks about resources and they will be helpful to other veterans.

4. I have edited your post to remove accusations about VA lying and VA downgrades to save money. They have no place or purpose on the PEB Forum.

Ron
cc: @Jason Perry
 
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