Social Security Administration (SSA) Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) compensation...

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#1
As such, I offer the following additional information to potentially yield some assistance in the pursuit for SSA SSDI disability compensation:

In my opinion referencing to SSA SSDI, it's best to apply for SSA SSDI at your earliest opportunity in order to establish and secure the date of filing for any potential back payment at this point. Indeed, while in the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process, the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process documentation should provide additional medical evidence to support your SSA SSDI application for sure!

The SSDI and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the SSA and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program. SSI pays benefits based on financial need while SSDI pays benefits to you and certain members of your family if you are "insured," meaning that you worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes.

Being a “Wounded Warrior” and/or a DoVA “veteran rated 100% P&T” shall yield a priority/expedited processing option while your file is being adjudicated in the SSA SSDI disability compensation program.

That said, please ensure to tell the SSA representative if applying in person that you are a “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” or enter “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” in the remarks section of the SSDI application if applying online.

In retrospect, the SSA's SSDI is an "all" or "none" based total disability program, unlike the DoVA which compensates for numerous medical conditions which may not be totally disabling.

In reference to SSA SSDI, the State Agency or Disability Determination Services (DDS) need to know all medical conditions which could potentially affect your ability to perform substantial gainful activity (SGA) and the SSA overall SSDI determination.

Most Social Security disability claims are initially processed through a network of local SSA field offices and State agencies (with a total of 54 across the U.S. usually called DDS). Subsequent appeals of unfavorable determinations may be decided in a DDS or by one of the 1,500 administrative law judges (ALJ) throughout the U.S. in the SSA's Office of Disability Adjudication and Review.

The SSA's State Agency or DDS function is to perform an evaluation of medical disability (i.e., claimant is found disabled or not disabled under SSA rules) only for the SSA SSDI case if it meets all regulatory SSA SSDI qualifications. If all SSDI qualifications are validated, then SSA Field Office forwards the SSDI case file to the applicable State Agency or DDS.

In reference to a SSDI Lawyer which some applicants shall hire at their own expense, that's a good option if an individual truly meets the SSA SSDI qualifications, but were denied for whatever reason(s). To that extent and in most cases, the SSDI applicant doesn't properly complete all the required SSA SSDI forms. They vaguely or not legibly complete the forms then expect the SSA & SSA DDS to interpret their feedback. Won't happen; it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

In addition, the SSA DDS won't receive the requested medical documentation upon request from the applicant's medical providers. It's not the fault of the SSDI applicant, but it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

So, if the aforementioned observations were a result in the SSA's denial of an individual’s SSDI application, then it's probably in the best interest of the individual to hire the assistance of a seasoned SSDI attorney for potential award of SSA SSDI benefits.

Moreover, the SSA uses a GRID of Rules "concept" if a disability applicant doesn't meet qualifications as annotated on their established medical impairment listing. The GRIDs are set up as a series of charts which can be confusing. SSA will make a determination on what level of exertion you can perform at in a work environment. The categories are from least level of exertion to most: sedentary, light, medium, and heavy.

To that extent, the GRID of rules calculate when an applicant is disabled as based on age, RFC level (sedentary, light, medium, or heavy work), education level, and work history and skills. If the applicant's impairment(s) does not met or equal a listing, the GRID rules come into play when an individual has a severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment, is not working at SGA level, and the impairment prevents an individual from performing any of their past relevant work (PRW).

With that all said, if a SSDI applicant potentially wants that "disabled" SSDI determination, it's in the applicant's BEST interest to thoroughly and accurately complete ALL requested SSA DDS documentation in a timely manner. Believe it or not, especially if the SSDI applicant identifies themselves as a "Wounded Warrior and/or veteran rated 100% P&T" eligible, the SSA DDS are trying to make a swift well-informed medical determination.

Due to an U.S. Congressional mandate to review at least half of the proposed disability, concurrent disability, and SSI allowances within the 11 SSA Quality Review Offices, your SSA disability application may become a lucky participant within the Social Security Disability Claims Process.

Upon completion of the SSA SSDI process, it's a good idea to request a complete copy of your SSA case file (for a nominal fee) upon availability. The "disability determination explanation" packet will include at a minimum "findings of fact and analysis of evidence" and an "assessment of vocational factors" write-ups which are very detailed to yield better explanations of any potential SSDI denial.

Upon the successful award of a "disabled" determination by SSA SSDI criteria via the State DDS since it's not a permanent disability compensation federal program, the SSA has special rules which allow an individual to work temporarily without losing their Social Security disability benefits.

With the Ticket to Work program, Work Incentives are available to you when you assign your Ticket to an Employment Network. Work Incentives make it easier for adults with disabilities to work and still receive health care and cash benefits from Social Security. Also, Work Incentives allow you to remain in control of your finances and health care during your transition to work and financial independence.

Indeed, you are eligible for several Work Incentives: the Trial Work Period (TWP) for SSDI recipients only, the Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients, and the Protection from Medical Continuing Disability Reviews (CDR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients.

In particularly for the SSDI recipients only, the SSA's TWP allows an SSDI recipient to test their ability to work for at least nine months (not necessarily consecutive) in a rolling 60-month period without losing benefits. As long as the SSDI recipient remains disabled, they can get full Social Security disability benefits during those nine months no matter how much the SSDI recipient earns as a maximum limit, but in 2014 any monthly earnings which exceeds $770 is considered a month of services for an individual's TWP.

At your leisure, I strongly suggest that you visit the following resources to obtain detailed information about the SSA disability evaluations and SSA SSDI GRID of rules:

1. http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-app-p02.htm
2. http://www.ultimatedisabilityguide.com/grid_rules.html
3. http://www.socialsecurity.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/index.htm

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#3
Your info is outstanding warrior 644
Welcome to the PEB Forum! :)

Thanks; indeed, it's definitely pleasing to hear that this information is helpful to you and other PEB Forum members!

To that extent, take care, please continue to get well, and most importantly enjoy life! :cool:

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#4
UPDATE #1

As such, I offer the following additional information to potentially yield some assistance in the pursuit for SSA SSDI disability compensation:

In my opinion referencing to SSA SSDI, it's best to apply for SSA SSDI at your earliest opportunity in order to establish and secure the date of filing for any potential back payment at this point. Indeed, while in the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process, the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process documentation should provide additional medical evidence to support your SSA SSDI application for sure!

The SSDI and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the SSA and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program. SSI pays benefits based on financial need while SSDI pays benefits to you and certain members of your family if you are "insured," meaning that you worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes.

Being a “Wounded Warrior” and/or a DoVA “veteran rated 100% P&T” shall yield a priority/expedited processing option while your file is being adjudicated in the SSA SSDI disability compensation program.

That said, please ensure to tell the SSA representative if applying in person that you are a “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” or enter “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” in the remarks section of the SSDI application if applying online.

In retrospect, the SSA's SSDI is an "all" or "none" based total disability program, unlike the DoVA which compensates for numerous medical conditions which may not be totally disabling.

In reference to SSA SSDI, the State Agency or Disability Determination Services (DDS) need to know all medical conditions which could potentially affect your ability to perform substantial gainful activity (SGA) and the SSA overall SSDI determination.

Most Social Security disability claims are initially processed through a network of local SSA field offices and State agencies (with a total of 54 across the U.S. usually called DDS). Subsequent appeals of unfavorable determinations may be decided in a DDS or by one of the 1,500 administrative law judges (ALJ) throughout the U.S. in the SSA's Office of Disability Adjudication and Review.

The SSA's State Agency or DDS function is to perform an evaluation of medical disability (i.e., claimant is found disabled or not disabled under SSA rules) only for the SSA SSDI case if it meets all regulatory SSA SSDI qualifications. If all SSDI qualifications are validated, then SSA Field Office forwards the SSDI case file to the applicable State Agency or DDS.

In reference to a SSDI Lawyer which some applicants shall hire at their own expense, that's a good option if an individual truly meets the SSA SSDI qualifications, but were denied for whatever reason(s). To that extent and in most cases, the SSDI applicant doesn't properly complete all the required SSA SSDI forms. They vaguely or not legibly complete the forms then expect the SSA & SSA DDS to interpret their feedback. Won't happen; it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

In addition, the SSA DDS won't receive the requested medical documentation upon request from the applicant's medical providers. It's not the fault of the SSDI applicant, but it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

So, if the aforementioned observations were a result in the SSA's denial of an individual’s SSDI application, then it's probably in the best interest of the individual to hire the assistance of a seasoned SSDI attorney for potential award of SSA SSDI benefits.

Moreover, the SSA uses a GRID of Rules "concept" if a disability applicant doesn't meet qualifications as annotated on their established medical impairment listing. The GRIDs are set up as a series of charts which can be confusing. SSA will make a determination on what level of exertion you can perform at in a work environment. The categories are from least level of exertion to most: sedentary, light, medium, and heavy.

To that extent, the GRID of rules calculate when an applicant is disabled as based on age, RFC level (sedentary, light, medium, or heavy work), education level, and work history and skills. If the applicant's impairment(s) does not met or equal a listing, the GRID rules come into play when an individual has a severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment, is not working at SGA level, and the impairment prevents an individual from performing any of their past relevant work (PRW).

With that all said, if a SSDI applicant potentially wants that "disabled" SSDI determination, it's in the applicant's BEST interest to thoroughly and accurately complete ALL requested SSA DDS documentation in a timely manner. Believe it or not, especially if the SSDI applicant identifies themselves as a "Wounded Warrior and/or veteran rated 100% P&T" eligible, the SSA DDS are trying to make a swift well-informed medical determination.

Due to an U.S. Congressional mandate to review at least half of the proposed disability, concurrent disability, and SSI allowances within the 11 SSA Quality Review Offices, your SSA disability application may become a lucky participant within the Social Security Disability Claims Process.

Upon completion of the SSA SSDI process, it's a good idea to request a complete copy of your SSA case file (for a nominal fee) upon availability. The "disability determination explanation" packet will include at a minimum "findings of fact and analysis of evidence" and an "assessment of vocational factors" write-ups which are very detailed to yield better explanations of any potential SSDI denial.

Upon the successful award of a "disabled" determination by SSA SSDI criteria via the State DDS since it's not a permanent disability compensation federal program, the SSA has special rules which allow an individual to work temporarily without losing their Social Security disability benefits.

With the Ticket to Work program, Work Incentives are available to you when you assign your Ticket to an Employment Network. Work Incentives make it easier for adults with disabilities to work and still receive health care and cash benefits from Social Security. Also, Work Incentives allow you to remain in control of your finances and health care during your transition to work and financial independence.

Indeed, you are eligible for several Work Incentives: the Trial Work Period (TWP) for SSDI recipients only, the Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients, and the Protection from Medical Continuing Disability Reviews (CDR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients.

In particularly for the SSDI recipients only, the SSA's TWP allows an SSDI recipient to test their ability to work for at least nine months (not necessarily consecutive) in a rolling 60-month period without losing benefits. As long as the SSDI recipient remains disabled, they can get full Social Security disability benefits during those nine months no matter how much the SSDI recipient earns as a maximum limit, but in 2015 any monthly earnings which exceeds $780 is considered a month of services for an individual's TWP.

At your leisure, I strongly suggest that you visit the following resources to obtain detailed information about the SSA disability evaluations and SSA SSDI GRID of rules:

1. http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-app-p02.htm
2. http://www.ultimatedisabilityguide.com/grid_rules.html
3. http://www.socialsecurity.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/index.htm

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

Warrior644

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#5
UPDATE #2:

As such, I offer the following additional information to potentially yield some assistance in the pursuit for SSA SSDI disability compensation:

In my opinion referencing to SSA SSDI, it's best to apply for SSA SSDI at your earliest opportunity in order to establish and secure the date of filing for any potential back payment at this point. Indeed, while in the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process, the DoD IDES MEB/PEB process documentation should provide additional medical evidence to support your SSA SSDI application for sure!

The SSDI and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the SSA and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program. SSI pays benefits based on financial need while SSDI pays benefits to you and certain members of your family if you are "insured," meaning that you worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes.

Being a “Wounded Warrior” and/or a DoVA “veteran rated 100% P&T” shall yield a priority/expedited processing option while your file is being adjudicated in the SSA SSDI disability compensation program.

That said, please ensure to tell the SSA representative if applying in person that you are a “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” or enter “Wounded Warrior and/or a veteran rated 100% P&T” in the remarks section of the SSDI application if applying online.

In retrospect, the SSA's SSDI is an "all" or "none" based total disability program, unlike the DoVA which compensates for numerous medical conditions which may not be totally disabling.

In reference to SSA SSDI, the State Agency or Disability Determination Services (DDS) need to know all medical conditions which could potentially affect your ability to perform substantial gainful activity (SGA) and the SSA overall SSDI determination.

Most Social Security disability claims are initially processed through a network of local SSA field offices and State agencies (with a total of 54 across the U.S. usually called DDS). Subsequent appeals of unfavorable determinations may be decided in a DDS or by one of the 1,500 administrative law judges (ALJ) throughout the U.S. in the SSA's Office of Disability Adjudication and Review.

The SSA's State Agency or DDS function is to perform an evaluation of medical disability (i.e., claimant is found disabled or not disabled under SSA rules) only for the SSA SSDI case if it meets all regulatory SSA SSDI qualifications. If all SSDI qualifications are validated, then SSA Field Office forwards the SSDI case file to the applicable State Agency or DDS.

In reference to a SSDI Lawyer which some applicants shall hire at their own expense, that's a good option if an individual truly meets the SSA SSDI qualifications, but were denied for whatever reason(s). To that extent and in most cases, the SSDI applicant doesn't properly complete all the required SSA SSDI forms. They vaguely or not legibly complete the forms then expect the SSA & SSA DDS to interpret their feedback. Won't happen; it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

In addition, the SSA DDS won't receive the requested medical documentation upon request from the applicant's medical providers. It's not the fault of the SSDI applicant, but it will ultimately result in a denial of SSDI benefits.

So, if the aforementioned observations were a result in the SSA's denial of an individual’s SSDI application, then it's probably in the best interest of the individual to hire the assistance of a seasoned SSDI attorney for potential award of SSA SSDI benefits.

Moreover, the SSA uses a GRID of Rules "concept" if a disability applicant doesn't meet qualifications as annotated on their established medical impairment listing. The GRIDs are set up as a series of charts which can be confusing. SSA will make a determination on what level of exertion you can perform at in a work environment. The categories are from least level of exertion to most: sedentary, light, medium, and heavy.

To that extent, the GRID of rules calculate when an applicant is disabled as based on age, RFC level (sedentary, light, medium, or heavy work), education level, and work history and skills. If the applicant's impairment(s) does not met or equal a listing, the GRID rules come into play when an individual has a severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment, is not working at SGA level, and the impairment prevents an individual from performing any of their past relevant work (PRW).

With that all said, if a SSDI applicant potentially wants that "disabled" SSDI determination, it's in the applicant's BEST interest to thoroughly and accurately complete ALL requested SSA DDS documentation in a timely manner. Believe it or not, especially if the SSDI applicant identifies themselves as a "Wounded Warrior and/or veteran rated 100% P&T" eligible, the SSA DDS are trying to make a swift well-informed medical determination.

Due to an U.S. Congressional mandate to review at least half of the proposed disability, concurrent disability, and SSI allowances within the 11 SSA Quality Review Offices, your SSA disability application may become a lucky participant within the Social Security Disability Claims Process.

Upon completion of the SSA SSDI process, it's a good idea to request a complete copy of your SSA case file (for a nominal fee) upon availability. The "disability determination explanation" packet will include at a minimum "findings of fact and analysis of evidence" and an "assessment of vocational factors" write-ups which are very detailed to yield better explanations of any potential SSDI denial.

Upon the successful award of a "disabled" determination by SSA SSDI criteria via the State DDS since it's not a permanent disability compensation federal program, the SSA has special rules which allow an individual to work temporarily without losing their Social Security disability benefits.

With the Ticket to Work program, Work Incentives are available to you when you assign your Ticket to an Employment Network. Work Incentives make it easier for adults with disabilities to work and still receive health care and cash benefits from Social Security. Also, Work Incentives allow you to remain in control of your finances and health care during your transition to work and financial independence.

Indeed, you are eligible for several Work Incentives: the Trial Work Period (TWP) for SSDI recipients only, the Expedited Reinstatement (EXR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients, and the Protection from Medical Continuing Disability Reviews (CDR) for both SSDI and SSI recipients.

In particularly for the SSDI recipients only, the SSA's TWP allows an SSDI recipient to test their ability to work for at least nine months (not necessarily consecutive) in a rolling 60-month period without losing benefits. As long as the SSDI recipient remains disabled, they can get full Social Security disability benefits during those nine months no matter how much the SSDI recipient earns as a maximum limit, but in 2016 any monthly earnings which exceeds $810 is considered a month of services for an individual's TWP.

At your leisure, I strongly suggest that you visit the following resources to obtain detailed information about the SSA disability evaluations and SSA SSDI GRID of rules:

1. http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-app-p02.htm
2. http://www.ultimatedisabilityguide.com/grid_rules.html
3. http://www.socialsecurity.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/index.htm

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer."

Best Wishes!
 

ctbenja1015

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#6
If you do hire an attorney, they have access to all of your Social Security records and can make you copies at no charge to you. (Tip from SSA Reviewer) The attorney is locked into the FEE Agreement and are not allowed to charge additional fees.

The timeline varies at different locations. I had my initial and reconsideration denials within 5 months and my hearing in the 8th month, the decision, back pay and 1st payment by the 11th month. So if you are eligible for expedited process it is worth it. My wife filed 18 months ago and is still waiting to get a hearing.
 
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