ssdi: working while on ssdi

THolleyH46

PEB Forum Veteran
If the first three days of work are any indication of my progress I don't think I will make it to 9 months. I was hurting big time.

But thank you the same.
 

JensMom

Registered Member
I have started the trial work period a week ago. My employer wants me to work full time, but after 3 days, my body is already going through a crisis. I wanted to start part time to not put my body through this. I'm getting paid $21.00/HR, will I lose my benefits if I try to finish out the month, full time (if I can, physically) before resigning. I feel embarrased that I have to resign, but I'm in terrible pain.
 

gsfowler

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
I have started the trial work period a week ago. My employer wants me to work full time, but after 3 days, my body is already going through a crisis. I wanted to start part time to not put my body through this. I'm getting paid $21.00/HR, will I lose my benefits if I try to finish out the month, full time (if I can, physically) before resigning. I feel embarrased that I have to resign, but I'm in terrible pain.
No, you should not lose your benefits.

The ticket to work program allows you a trial work period of 9 months cumulative.

If you are attempting to work and unable to continue due to your disabilities, SSA will continue to pay your disability award. Communicate your challenges with your employer and see if they are willing to accommodate a modified schedule to allow you to adjust.
 

fendersburn

Registered Member
I just started my trial work period. I got hired on as an independent contractor and will get a 1099 not a W2. I will have to pay my own taxes.

How does this effect my SGA limits?

I called Social Security and told them I was going to work. I gave them the name of the company, the address and the name of the business owner. The guy on the phone said I could make all the money I want for 9 months but then I can only make $1170 and not lose my benefits. He said they would be sending me something in the mail.

Wondering how the contractor part effects my SGA.
Howdy,,,just read your post,,,I'm interested in doing the same thing...Have you been staying at the 1170$ mark?? Has anything effected your benefits?? Thanks -John
 

THolleyH46

PEB Forum Veteran
Howdy,,,just read your post,,,I'm interested in doing the same thing...Have you been staying at the 1170$ mark?? Has anything effected your benefits?? Thanks -John
I worked 8 months but Social Security said I worked 9. They can’t count.

At first they said I worked 10 and said I was no longer disabled and I entered the extended period of eligibility. I sent them a letter and proof I only worked 8 months. They said it was 9 but then that I was still disabled.

I made a lot more than the $1170. I had a part time job that paid $400 per day so I made a lot for theee or four months.

Right now I am not working but am contemplating taking a temporary federal job. It’s for a year to two years. Then I would go into the 36 months of extended eligibility.

If you make less than SGA you still get your benefits. If you make more they withhold part or all of your benefits. I would be making more most likely. You have to report your income every month.

I don’t know what happens after the 36 months.
 

THolleyH46

PEB Forum Veteran
Put the beer down, you are giving bad advice. ^^^

I work at the SSA. Please disregard what you have read from above. I have posted the regulation and there are no real exceptions to it.

If you work and make $ without reporting it, you may get caught. It is not worth it. People get caught all of the time.
I am considering going into the 36 months of extended eligibility. I have used up my 9 trial months.

It is a temp federal job with an intermittent, part time full time job guaranteed for one day less than a year extendable to two years. So at best it’s a two year job.

What happens when the job ends and I am no longer working and what happens after the 36 months? Do I get re-evaluated?

I can’t get a clear answer from Social Security.

Thanks.
 

THolleyH46

PEB Forum Veteran
I am considering going into the 36 months of extended eligibility. I have used up my 9 trial months.

It is a temp federal job with an intermittent, part time full time job guaranteed for one day less than a year extendable to two years. So at best it’s a two year job.

What happens when the job ends and I am no longer working and what happens after the 36 months? Do I get re-evaluated?

I can’t get a clear answer from Social Security.

Thanks.
@gsfowler

Bump
 

gsfowler

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
If more than 36 months go by and you get re-injured, then you must reapply from scratch.

If at the end of the 24 months of employment you become disabled and are unable to work, then you can reopen your claim.

Just remember that you have used all of your trial work period and will no longer be eligible under the ticket-to-work program.

In a sense, that is a good think because in the extended period, SGA is $1120 per month (2019) and for the ticket-to-work any earnings over $880 trigger a trial work period.


Extended Period of Eligibility

An Extended Period of Eligibility (EPE) is the 36 month time period in which your Social Security Disability benefits may be stopped and re-started without requiring a new disability determination by the Social Security Administration.

The Extended Period of Eligibility would apply to you if you received Social Security Disability benefits, returned to work, and found yourself once again unable to work due to your disability. As long as you are within the 36-month EPE window, you will be able to regain your benefits following your return and departure from work.

If more than 36 months pass and you become disabled again, the process of applying for Social Security Disability benefits must begin again – which includes providing proof of disability or impairment.

The Extended Period of Eligibility begins after a beneficiary goes through a trial work period. The trial work period allows you to attempt returning to work for at least nine months without losing Social Security Disability benefits. The trial work period continues until you have worked nine trial months over a 60 month span, and allows you to receive Social Security Disability benefits despite your level of income.

During the Extended Period of Eligibility, you will receive full Social Security Disability benefits for each month that you do not work, or if your earnings do not exceed the Social Security Administration’s substantial gainful activity level. According to 2019 guidelines set by the Social Security Administration, substantial gainful activity levels are $1,220 in earnings per month if a beneficiary is not vision-impaired and $2,040 per month if the beneficiary is legally blind. If your monthly earnings exceed the monthly substantial gainful activity limit during the Extended Period of Eligibility, no Social Security Disability benefits will be paid for those months.

If you are still eligible to receive Social Security Disability benefits at the end of the 36-month Extended Period of Eligibility, even if you worked for a period of time during those 36 months, your benefits will continue until you return to work or your condition improves enough for you to seek employment.
 
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