Temp dead man profile, PCS from remote oconus to conus. What to expect/advice.

roae

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I've been in the army for about 2 years. I injured my back towards the end of a year long AIT. I didn't want to be stuck in AIT so I fought through it, passed all PT tests, and graduated my ASI course and PCS'd to my first duty station. Once I got here (to my remote base) I carried on with my responsibilities until my back got too bad to ignore. After I notified the unit medic and a few failed medications, I set up an appointment through TRICARE REMOTE to have an orthopedic doctor in country check me out. After a positive SLR the doctor told me to get an MRI. The MRI showed that I have a herniated disc(L5-S1), DDD, an annular tear, spinal stenosis, scoliosis, and sciatica. The Doctor recommended a Posterior Spinal Fusion + TLIF. My profiling officer is in Germany and I've been on 3 temporary profiles for a combination of 4 months(with a few short lapses in profile coverage) ever since the MRI results. The Major in charge of profiling came down this month and basically told me to do physical therapy excercises I find on google/youtube, hold out until I PCS in February to Fort Hood, and wrote a temp profile that will last until then.

My questions are:
When I get to Fort Hood will I be able to talk to the inprocessing medical professional about a permanent profile/next steps?
If granted, would this be an automatic P3 profile that triggers a MEB?
Can I refuse surgery due to the horror stories I see of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome, and still receive compensation?
Will I have to go through a long process of physical therapy even though I've been doing it on my own(to no avail) and my MRI shows conditions that aren't magically fixed by PT?
None of this is documented on my TRICAREONLINE, will my documentation(every appointment/mri disc ((with multiple copies))/Medication baggies) be enough?
etc.

any advice/answer/information is appreciated.
Thank you
 

oddpedestrian

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You probably have to start all over again at your new duty station you cannot force them to initiate an MEB your PCM will do it when they feel all other options have failed given your age is probably a factor on the stonewalling.
 

roae

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You probably have to start all over again at your new duty station you cannot force them to initiate an MEB your PCM will do it when they feel all other options have failed given your age is probably a factor on the stonewalling.
Got it. I'm 27 if that helps. I really just feel like they dont want to deal with it here.
 

RonG

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Ref: "My questions are:
When I get to Fort Hood will I be able to talk to the inprocessing medical professional about a permanent profile/next steps?"

Not a bad question, but I had at least 12 PCS moves during my career and I don't remember ever seeing a medical representative during in-processing. Usually it involved just personnel and finance. I think the personnel representatives took the medical records and ensured they were delivered to the dispensary or other MTF. It has been many years since then, but I believe that is the way it worked.

Anyway, shortly after you arrive you could visit the MTF and discuss your situation with the personnel at that location.

Maybe @oddpedestrian could comment on this.

Good luck,
Ron
 

chaplaincharlie

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I would have a frank talk with the PCM at Ft Hood about your limitations and how it effects your military duties. As pointed out above, you have no authority to make it happen. I always suggest you have the conversation in such a way that the doctor thinks it is his/her idea.

As for failed back surgeries: I have had three procedures, all in different parts of the back, all successful. Each surgery took me from in pain to pain free. I suspect people's surgery that don't go well tell everybody while those who have had successes are not as vocal. Obviously, you have to say to not have the surgery.
 
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