Thyroid

brianwl

PEB Forum Veteran
#1
Hi Jason,

It's been a long time. I just ran across a guy going TDRL for a Thyroid problem. People need to understand the thyroid is no reason for PEB action.

I would like to right an article and post it here. Are you okay with that? I can send it to you if you prefer.

Brian
 

Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#2
Brian!!

Great to see you here!

People need to understand the thyroid is no reason for PEB action.
Not sure what you mean here....I am thinking (hoping) you mean that thyroid problems are a reason for PEB action? Or are you stating/arguing for a fit finding based on thyroid problems?

Either way, I guess you should write what you propose and we can discuss it later.

Jason
 

brianwl

PEB Forum Veteran
#4
Quick intro for those that don't know me. I am one of the original members of this forum. But I found myself spread to thin by trying to help with MEB/PEB issues, fighting Congress to get CR for ALL retirees, and being a Vet Advocate helping Vets win their claims with both the VA and SSA (SSDI). Something had to give.

I have had 2 operations on my Thyroid, 1991 had a goiter removed on active duty and put on synthetic thyroid and returned to duty with no problems. 2018 the other side became cancerous and the remainder of the thryroid has been removed. Also treated with radioactive iodine. I am cancer free and on synthetic thyroid.

The thyroid is serious business and a very important organ. But lets keep things in context, military only. Civilian world care cannot be followed if one wants to keep their military career.

Very rarely problems cannot be cured by simply removing the entire thyroid and placing the patient on a synthetic thyroid medication. Once the correct amount is determined and monitored, the person is fully deployable after about 6 months of treatment. The dosage rarely changes and only requires a blood test once a year to ensure the dosage is still correct.

Some cancers spread beyond the thyroid and are in fact good reason for PEB action and retirement on PDRL.

Disorders like Graves disease can be completely cured by removal of the entire thyroid.

The civilian world provides plenty of time to play around with various types of treatment with full thryroidectomy being the last thing you want to do.

Sure, the offer of retirement from the PEB coupled with the 100% rating from the VA sounds like a good deal. It's NOT. First of all, you don't get your military retirement pay once the VA starts paying you. Second the 100% rating is only temporary. Once the issue is resolved, you will be reduced to 10%. Unless it is a rare cancer that spreads to the rest of the body.

In a perfect world where Ch61 retirees get to keep their retired pay after the VA does their thing, Concurrent Receipt, your pay is NOT going to be the 30 - 100% DoD promised you. It will be 2.5% x length of service x base pay at time of retirement. That's all and no more. If the PEB says you get 50% of your $5000.00 pay, they are lying and they know they are lying.

Bottom line, corner your Dr and ask if the Thyroid problem can be completely cured by it's removal. If the answer is yes, demand the surgery and get on with your life. Most Dr's don't understand the ramification of putting you through an MEB/PEB. They just want to follow procedure/protocol. Unfortunately in this case, that protocol is written for civilian patients with nothing to lose.

Sorry if I rambled. I'll answer any and all questions.
 

brianwl

PEB Forum Veteran
#5
Some complicated thyroid cases have serious implications.
Yes they do. Playing lab rat while the Dr's throw various medications and treatments at you as a civilian is fine.

In the military the amount of time a person can be of no use to their unit.

There is no reason to end a military career for something ad simple as removing an appendix, which how simple a full thyroidectomy is.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#6
There are several long term problem that can occur with thyroid surgery; one of which is the inability to regulate your calcium level. Calcium is critical to all nerve functioning. I suspect that is one of several reasons civilian providers go slow.
 

brianwl

PEB Forum Veteran
#7
There are several long term problem that can occur with thyroid surgery; one of which is the inability to regulate your calcium level. Calcium is critical to all nerve functioning. I suspect that is one of several reasons civilian providers go slow.
I am on both calcium and synthetic thyroid medication.

The point is, military is different and there is no reason to end a career over it.
 

chaplaincharlie

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
#8
While I agree that no one wants to end a career over a thyroid; medical ethics require conservative treatment. There are consideration beyond a career. Unstable calcium is life threatening.
 

brianwl

PEB Forum Veteran
#9
While I agree that no one wants to end a career over a thyroid; medical ethics require conservative treatment. There are consideration beyond a career. Unstable calcium is life threatening.
Yes it is, and solved with a daily (although giant) pill. Mine is 3 times a day.

And simple blood tests.

I see no reason for someone to lose $3000.00 per month or more over a simple fix. It is ethical based on circumstances. In this case military vs civilian.
 

senkrad

Registered Member
#14
I'm similar situation (I'm a Reservist), involving a neck/upper back injury in Afghanistan in 2010 that lead to a total thyroidectomy and additional issues, I'm currently in the process of having a PEB/MEB start (15 years in services) and am looking for some assistance or advice, the PDRL or Medical Retirement is my goal.

Reaching out, feeling overwhelmed. Thank you.
 
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