VA checking medical records for peb

haz

PEB Forum Regular Member
hi,
what does the va look for when checking medical records for a peb? do they look at the notes from doctor visits that lists everything under problems, do they ask you how you feel, or do they give you an exam with a specialist.
 

4Cords

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
My husband went through a series of exams with the VA during his MEB/PEB process. He saw a general practitioner, an eye doc, mental health, and had a hearing exam with them. His conditions are auto-immune related, the GP covered those things. He did not see a specialist in that field- which would have been an internist or rheumatologist.
 

AFPEBLO

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
what does the va look for when checking medical records for a peb? do they look at the notes from doctor visits that lists everything under problems, do they ask you how you feel, or do they give you an exam with a specialist.
Based on my understanding of the program and feedback from folks I know going through the pilot they look for any potentially ratable condition by completely going through your service treatment record (their term for your medical record). A few guys that work with me and are going through MEBs were very impressed with the thoroughness by the VA on the records review.

From there it really depends on the situation and conditions. Based on what they feel is needed you may have multiple appointments scheduled from there, or they may defer that decision to the person conducting the exam. Also, you may be under the care of a specialist, but if they feel your case is sufficiently documented they may not need further information or workup.
 

xeno

Super Moderator
Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
hi,
what does the va look for when checking medical records for a peb? do they look at the notes from doctor visits that lists everything under problems, do they ask you how you feel, or do they give you an exam with a specialist.
I think you might be confused.

MEB/IPEB/FPEB is the system put in place to handle medical problems with enlisted/officer DoD personnel.

Think of VA as "workman's comp". They have have a system to compensate you (rate?)after your exit the military. At this time you should have a exam upon your discharge.

Two completely different things. Yes VA rep will set down and list everything (or should) that are continuing issues(aliments?) in your medical records. They will probably send you out to appointments.
 

mascabn

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
I would like to ad that you don't need to be discharged from service to be rated by the VA. You can seek a rating while still serving. My brother was rated halfway through his naval career, my husband is 100% and still serving although on his way out.
 

AFPEBLO

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Xeno,

Understand where you are coming from but this question is posted under the Pilot Program. All MEBs in the Pilot Program include the VA workup towards the beginning of the process. The military’s MEB narrative is actually partially based on the VA’s exam. The purpose is to complete the DoD and VA portions at the same time.
 

greenne

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
Haz,

If you are reffering to the initial meeting with the VA rep..usually set up by your PEBLO.... the VA rep will go over your entire medical record with you. Both of you will look for conditions you may be able to claim with the va. Then, you will fill out the VA form 21-0819. After I hand filled mine the VA rep typed it out. The block on the front of the form (Medical Conditions to be considered for fitness for duty) is usually filled filled out by your peblo. That is what you are being boarded for. On the back is another block--ADDITIONAL CONDIONS. Put anything and everything you can think of in there for possible treatment/compensation. Do you have bad knees? Does your back hurt? Do you have tinnitus? Do you have acne? etc. etc.

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO GET IT EXAMINED AND POSSIBLY ACKNOWLEDGED.....PUT IT IN THERE!!!

Anyways, I hope you're reffering to the pilot program...after the appt my form was signed, sent to big VA and appts scheduled at the DC VAMC. For me, everything went smooth--va narrative indicated they acknowledged every condition I claimed. Every exam had a quick records review, then usually the Dr asked me questions on how the conditions impacted my life, and then sometimes a quick physical exam.

Nate
 

NONATUS

PEB Forum Regular Member
Fascinating. Was your brother or his family concerned that his drive to keep working would lower his warranted VA disability rating before it was assessed? My concern is that I been found unfit and now VA reviewing records. I'm afraid my career sucessess despite the chronic nature of my injuries (now getting far far more delibitating) will impact my warranted rating. Always afraid those that fight through pain like your brother did will be "rewarded" with a lower than warranted disability rating because we've proven we can beat it. We should not be punished for physical and mental fortitude. Thankyou.
 

Jason Perry

Benevolent Leader
Site Founder
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PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
NONATUS, Yes we did worry, and both my husband and my brother were initially rated lower than the eventual outcome. In fact in treating my husbands PTSD, and chronic pain, or documenting them he initially wasn't treated with any sort of -importance (for lack of better word). Initially he was rated by the VA at 10% for a mood disorder. He had severly dislocated his shoulder in Iraq in 2005. His preferance wasn't to get rated but put back together so he could carry on. As time went on his conditions became harder and harder to ignore. Everytime he went to drill, things would become more obvious to the point of profound. We had moments of crisis here at home, had to lock up weapons, then I became acutely involved. The PA that had been seeing him called to tell me about results of tests my husband had had. She came right out and told me it was all in his head, depression related blah blah, I WENT BALISTIC. I told her that yeah, he may be depressed, but she'd be depressed too if she hadn't slept more than an hour or two at a time for over two years. Fortunately or unfortunately, he woke up one morning and couldn't walk, I rushed him to the local VAMC, were he saw a real doctor, during the examination, the doc asked common questions that my husband couldn't answer, and had to ask me, the doc imeadiately went further, and assessed my husband for TBI, which started the ball rolling for Polytrauma. He went from 10% to 80% to 100% to 170% permanent and total over a five year span. He and I both would give it all back and so much more to not have gotten the rating. Who wants it.

Anyway, if you find yourself in the position that your ability to work through it has placed you lower than you really are, take your spouse, with you to your VA appointments, and have them tell the doctor how bad it really is, when it's time for applying for compensation, or increasing compensation occurs, you'll want to have already begun laying down your case for an increase. Your spouse, employer, chain, and close friends can write statements on your behalf about how they have witnessed your struggle with your conditions. My brother retired, and imeadiately went for an increase his condition wasn't severe. The reason you really should have your conditon acknowledged as soon as possible by the VA, is it makes the possibility of a finding of not service related harder for the VA to pull. Then if your forced into an MEB, your rating with the VA in theory makes it harder for the military to rate you at something stupid low, at least you'll have the VA's rating to argue should you need it, the military is supposed to use VASRD but are notorius for screwing a soldier. My brother got his rating which was relatively low, and didn't seek an increase for fear it would cause a medical discharge. Something he didn't want. He muddled through, went from 30% while serving, is now 50%. His problem were his knees. GOOD LUCK TO YOU I hope this helps.
 

mascabn

PEB Forum Regular Member
PEB Forum Veteran
And, when they go to examine you, always remember, when they go to do measurements, only go to where the pain starts, not to the furthest point you can go. My husband is very flexable, can go so far for exam, and has, but suffered for it severly, ended up on morphine. Use what time you have to build your case. If you can go to a civilian doc and get as much evidence and a clear prognosis. This can hold alot of weight with both the VA, and the MEB. I got tired of the VA jerk around, and because the VA was already billing my insurance for my husbands care, I took him to the best shoulder doc in the country for surgery. The VA and the doc for the MEB gave her surgical notes good weight.
 

NONATUS

PEB Forum Regular Member
wow--thanks so much for the advice. Truly sorry to hear of your ordeals--sounds all too familiar. Your husband is a very lucky man to have such a strong wife. God bless.
 
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