Yet another question

lucky208

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
It seems the further I travel the IDES process the more question arise. Before I go any further, thanks again for this site and the moderators that take time to try and assist us all navigate the murky waters. Ok, wasn't sure where to post but here is my question/ background info: The initiator (P3) for the IDES process for me was a shoulder condition but during this process I've developed a heart condition. Both conditions are annotated in my treatment records/ profile with condition/ meds/ surgeries. The MEB medical staff state that both conditions do not meet retention standards and will be annotated as such in the NARSUM but the VA MSC had only the shoulder condition listed during my initial VA MSC meeting. Will the DOD rate both conditions that do not meet retention standards or just the one that initiated the IDES process? Thanks.
 

Warrior644

Staff Member
PEB Forum Lifetime Supporter
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
It seems the further I travel the IDES process the more question arise. Before I go any further, thanks again for this site and the moderators that take time to try and assist us all navigate the murky waters. Ok, wasn't sure where to post but here is my question/ background info: The initiator (P3) for the IDES process for me was a shoulder condition but during this process I've developed a heart condition. Both conditions are annotated in my treatment records/ profile with condition/ meds/ surgeries. The MEB medical staff state that both conditions do not meet retention standards and will be annotated as such in the NARSUM but the VA MSC had only the shoulder condition listed during my initial VA MSC meeting. Will the DOD rate both conditions that do not meet retention standards or just the one that initiated the IDES process? Thanks.
Welcome to the PEB Forum! :)

In retrospect, the MEB makes the medical determination (e.g., unacceptable or acceptable for continued military service/do meet or don't meet retention standards) while the PEB makes the fitness determination (e.g., unfit for duty or fit for duty) throughout the DoD IDES process.

Upon completion and receipt of all DoVA C&P examination results, the IDES MEB shall determine which conditions are "medically unacceptable" and "medically acceptable" at that point. It seems that the MEB medical staff are saying that (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions do not meet retention standards which is the same as being found "medically unacceptable" by the MEB.

Once the MEB forwards your IDES case file to the IDES PEB, the PEB shall review all medical conditions and then make a determination as to which are "unfit for duty" and "fit for duty" at that point. If there exist at least one "unfit for duty" medical condition then the PEB shall forward your IDES case file to the assigned DoVA D-RAS for adjudication of DoVA ratings on all PEB-referred "unfit for duty" conditions and all DoVA contentions annotated by the MSC.

With that all said, if the MEB determines that (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions are "medically unacceptable" or "don't meet retention standards" then your IDES case file shall be sent to the PEB for a fitness determination of all medical conditions. If the PEB determines that (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions are "unfit for duty" then your IDES case file shall be sent to the DoVA D-RAS for VA ratings assignment of (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions to include all DoVA contentions listed by the MSC. Upon the PEB's receipt of the DoVA ratings from the DoVA D-RAS, the PEB will adopt the VA ratings for (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions as the DoD rating for (at least) your shoulder and heart conditions, and then continue to finalize the overall IPEB findings.

Indeed, no worries; please continue to ask/post additional questions via the PEBFORUM as you continue to navigate thru the DoD IDES process. For sure, being "positively proactive" shall definitely help to ensure that you maximum your receipt of any potential DoD disability benefits & DoVA disability compensation at the conclusion of the DoD IDES process. Hope this helps. Take care!

Thus, I quite often comment that "possessing well-informed knowledge is truly a powerful equalizer!"

Best Wishes!
 

chaplaincharlie

Staff Member
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PEB Forum Veteran
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I would contact the MSC ASAP! In the IDES, DoD needs the VA to complete C&P on your heart condition in order to assign a percentage for an unfitting condition.
 

lucky208

PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
I would contact the MSC ASAP! In the IDES, DoD needs the VA to complete C&P on your heart condition in order to assign a percentage for an unfitting condition.
The heart condition will receive a VA exam along with the other conditions that I listed with the MSC. The shoulder condition has been a long rehab process but the heart condition even though not assigned a P3 is the more pressing issue.
Thanks again.
 

chaplaincharlie

Staff Member
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PEB Forum Veteran
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I'm glad you are getting your heart condition rated by the VA. Are you familiar with METS? If not, I suggest you become familiar. It how the VA ultimately rates most heart conditions.
 

RonG

Staff Member
PEB Forum Veteran
Registered Member
From two sources:

1. “The METS test measures the level of energy you exert when engaged in physical activities or work. It gathers information about the way your heart performs during these activities. This type of stress test usually requires that you ride a stationary bike or walk on a treadmill while medical professionals monitor your blood pressure, breathing, and heart rhythm.”

2. “Muscle cells use oxygen to help produce the energy to fuel contractions; the more oxygen you consume during (and after) exercise, the more calories you will burn. The human body expends approximately 5 calories of energy to consume 1 liter of oxygen. The more oxygen your body uses during physical activity, the more calories you will burn.”

“METs are used to estimate the energy expenditure for many common physical activities. One MET is an individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and is approximately 3.5 milliliters of oxygen consumed per kilogram bodyweight per minute (mL/kg/min) and represents the amount of oxygen used by the body while at rest (such as what you’re doing right now while reading this article). An activity that is 4 METs requires the body to use approximately four times as much oxygen than when at rest, which means it requires more energy and burns more calories.”
 
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